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Wilson: Mosque shootings ‘a crime against all of us’

March 15th, 2019|

Sen. Claire Wilson (D-Auburn) issued this statement on the deadly shooting today at two mosques in New Zealand that left 49 people dead and more than 20 badly wounded.

“My soul cries today.

“This crime against humanity is a crime against all of us, as we are all of one people and all of one place, if the most fundamental and precious tenets of humanity are a guide.

“I offer my support and fellowship to everyone else who is grieving. We are one, and we are less, today.”

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    Senate passes Wilson bill to make child care facilities gun-free zones

Senate passes Wilson bill to make child care facilities gun-free zones

March 11th, 2019|

Childcare facilities would carry the same prohibitions on deadly weapons as K-12 schools, under legislation passed today by the Senate.

“When parents send their kids off to school, they expect these facilities and grounds to be safe and secure,” said Sen. Claire Wilson (D-Auburn), the bill’s sponsor. “The state already prohibits people from possessing firearms on K-12 school campuses. This bill simply extends that same common-sense policy to childcare facilities.”

Wilson, the vice chair of the Senate Early Learning & K-12 Education Committee, said Senate Bill 5434 would help keep pre-school-age children safe from the deadly shootings that are spilling into public venues with increasing frequency.

“We should take all reasonable steps to maximize safety at facilities where children learn or are cared for,” Wilson said. “It just makes sense to make sure all our children are safe from firearms and gun violence in what we assume to be safe spaces.”

Wilson’s bill prohibits the possession of firearms on the premises of any licensed childcare center, childcare center provided-transportation, or other childcare center facility. The bill would also require family day care providers to keep any firearm on premises in a locked gun safe or unloaded in a locked room with a trigger lock or other disabling device. In addition, the bill would allow a local government to prohibit possession of a firearm in other popular sites for small children, such as parks and park facilities.

“If firearm prohibitions make sense for our schools, then they make just as much sense for child-care facilities and other areas where small children are likely to learn or play,” Wilson said. “Parents deserve some assurance their children will be safe from deadly gun violence in classic child venues like care facilities and public parks.”

Having passed the Senate on a 26-21 vote, the bill now goes to the House for consideration there.

Senate passes legislation to create LGBTQ Commission

March 6th, 2019|

Legislation to create a state commission to work with state agencies to develop and implement policies to address the unique needs of the LGBTQ community passed off the Senate floor today on a 34-14 vote.

Sponsored by Sen. Claire Wilson, Senate Bill 5356 would direct the governor to appoint commissioners who present a balanced and diverse representation of race and ethnicity, geography, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, socioeconomic status, and occupation.

“This will help members of our community whose identify puts them at extreme and disproportionate risk of violence, discrimination and other challenges,” Wilson said. “This commission can address the unique obstacles LGBTQ people encounter in everything from public school settings, to employment, to everyday interactions in our communities.”

Among other things, the commission would be directed to identify concerns specific to LGBTQ sub groups, such as LGBTQ people of color, individuals in the DD community, veterans, seniors, and many others.

You can hear Wilson’s thoughts on the need for this legislation by clicking on this short video.

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    Senate passes Wilson bill for comprehensive sexuality health education

Senate passes Wilson bill for comprehensive sexuality health education

February 27th, 2019|

Science-based, comprehensive sexuality health education would become a required component of public school curriculums, under legislation passed today by the Senate on a 28-21 vote.

“People call this sex education, but it’s about much more than sex,” said Sen. Claire Wilson (D-Auburn), the bill’s sponsor. “It’s about personal health, it’s about important life decisions, it’s about medical and economic consequences — all the things we want our young scholars to understand so that they can make the best choices for their health and their future.”

Senate Bill 5395 would require public schools to provide evidence-based, sexual health education curricula from a list developed by the state Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) or from other sources that satisfy OSPI guidelines.

Among other things, the curricula must:

  • encourage healthy relationships based on mutual respect and free from violence, coercion, and intimidation;
  • teach how to identify and respond to sexually violent attitudes or behaviors; and
  • emphasize the importance of affirmative consent before engaging in sexual activity.

“Many students are sexually assaulted or coerced into having sex, or find themselves in abusive relationships,” said Sen. Lisa Wellman (D-Mercer Island), who chairs the Senate Early Learning & K-12 Education Committee. “At its core, this bill is about safety. It’s about making sure that students have a safe place to ask questions, fully understand consent, and have the information they need to make safe decisions.”

Wilson, who is vice chair of the committee, said the curriculum does not direct teachers to instruct students on how to have sex, as has been incorrectly alleged by some; to the contrary, it is proven to reduce unintended pregnancy and STDs.

“The overwhelming majority of Americans, including parents and young people themselves, believe students should have access to comprehensive sexuality health education in middle school and high school and developmentally,” Wilson said. “Information is power. It’s time we do a better job of sharing it.”

SB 5395 would require schools to provide comprehensive sexual health education to students in grades 6-12 by Sept. 1, 2020, and to students in grades K-5 by Sept. 1, 2021.

Having passed the Senate, SB 5395 now goes to the House for consideration in that chamber.

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    Senate passes Wilson bill for better representation on oversight board

Senate passes Wilson bill for better representation on oversight board

February 25th, 2019|

The Senate passed legislation today to better represent the needs of youths and families overseen by the Children, Youth and Families Oversight Board by adding two board seats for people under the age of 25.

“Acknowledging the voice of youth is very important, especially for a board that oversees the health and safety of Washington residents from birth to adulthood,” said  Sen. Claire Wilson (D-Auburn), the bill’s sponsor. “This adds the voices of people more likely to be aware of systemic disparities in our state programs and to understand the impacts of any unintended consequences.”

Senate Bill 5435 expands the board — whose purview runs the gamut of early learning, juvenile rehabilitation, juvenile justice, and children and family services — from 18 seats to 20. The new members would include a current or former foster youth representative and someone with current or former involvement in the state juvenile rehabilitation administration.

“There is really no better person to oversee the performance of DCYF than one who has experienced the system firsthand,” Wilson said. “No one else on the board can understand the strengths and weaknesses of our system as fully as someone who has had to live with the results.”

The board oversees the state Department of Children, Youth and Families, a cabinet-level agency established in 2018 to promote the social, emotional, and physical well-being of children, youth and families across Washington. The agency was established in July 2018 by combining the Department of Early Learning with the Children’s Administration from the Department of Social and Health Services.

‘This office is a safe place’

January 16th, 2019|

This office is a “safe place” — free of hate, division, stereotypes, presumptions, labels or other societal constructs that exclude or marginalize people, whether intentionally or unintentionally — a place where people are welcome and respected regardless of gender, sexual preference, ethnicity, race, preferred identification, immigration status, age, religion or country of origin.

My office is open to all and invests special effort in providing an avenue to power and resources to marginalized communities. Everyone in this office is committed every day to shaping a Washington where all can enjoy equitable access to education, health, security and prosperity.

These essential values and priorities will be honored and reflected in any legislation I propose and strive to see passed into Washington state law.

Welcome!

Claire Wilson

Senator, 30th District

Bayley Dodd, Legislative Aide

Lilly Hollar, Session Aide

Maya Caruth, Intern

Meet Claire Wilson

January 15th, 2019|

For 25 years at the Puget Sound Educational Services District, Claire Wilson was an administrator in early education and family involvement. Prior to that, she taught pregnant and parenting teens at Mt. Tahoma High School and was a senior grants and contracts manager for the City of Seattle’s teen parent programs.

Claire brings her expertise to the Washington State Senate as vice chair of the Senate Early Learning & K-12 Education Committee. She also serves on the Transportation Committee and the Human Services, Reentry & Rehabilitation Committee.

Claire proudly identifies as a lesbian woman and mother. A long-term resident of the 30th Legislative District, born and raised in Washington State, Claire has lived in South King County since 1999. Her district includes Federal Way, Algona, Pacific, Milton, Des Moines and Auburn.

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    Wilson sworn into Senate, brings career experience in student needs

Wilson sworn into Senate, brings career experience in student needs

January 14th, 2019|

Sen. Claire Wilson (D-Auburn), a career educator, was sworn into office today and will put her considerable experience to use in her role as Vice Chair of the Senate Early Learning & K-12 Education Committee.

“We want Washington scholars to succeed and thrive in our education system, but the truth is not all scholars enjoy equitable access to the opportunities available in our schools,” Wilson said. “Many scholars face societal or systemic obstacles unique to their households, communities or other personal circumstances; it’s our job to make sure they can navigate those obstacles and fulfill their potential along with their peers.”

For 25 years at the Puget Sound Educational Services District, Claire Wilson specialized in early education and family involvement.  Prior to that, she taught pregnant and parenting teens at Mt. Tahoma High School and was a senior grants and contracts manager for the City of Seattle’s teen parent programs. She currently serves on the Federal Way School Board, which oversees the most diverse student population in the state and the fifth most diverse in the nation.

“Too many people in our communities feel excluded or unwelcome when it comes to opportunities and programs readily available to others,” Wilson said. “As a state and as a society, we need to take the extra effort to make sure our public services are accessible by everyone who needs them.”

Wilson will also serve on the Senate Transportation Committee and the Senate Human Services, Reentry & Rehabilitation Committee. A long-term resident of the 30th Legislative District, born and raised in Washington State, Claire has lived in South King County since 1999. She proudly identifies as a lesbian woman and mother and is a graduate of Roosevelt High and Washington State University and earned a Master’s Degree from the University of Northern Colorado.

Sign up for my email updates

January 14th, 2019|

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