Uncategorized

Summer Food and Meal Resources in Our Community

July 10th, 2020|

Dear neighbors,

Over the last several weeks, my office has received requests to help spread the word about the distribution of free food in our community for the many that are struggling to make ends meet due to the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Today’s newsletter is dedicated to providing information about programs in and near our district that are providing free food to families and individuals.

I hope this message finds you and your loved ones healthy and safe in these difficult times, and I urge everyone to mask up and continue to practice social distancing since we’ve seen another surge in COVID-19 infections in recent weeks. Remember, “my mask protects you, and your mask protects me.” Each of us must do our part to keep our community safe.

Summer Meals for K-12 Students

Seattle Public Schools Child looking out a window while biting into a green apple.

Meals at School Sites

Seattle Public Schools (SPS) has sack breakfasts and lunches available at school sites Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Find a list and map of sites here.

Reheatable prepared meals provided by FareStart are available for families to pick up at these school sites, as well.

Weekend student meal support is provided by the Backpack Brigade and Food for Schools. Families in need can pick up these non-perishable food items on Fridays.

Additional information:

  • ADA accessibility support is available at school sites.
  • Meals must not be eaten at the school due to social distancing requirements.
  • All students can pick up meals at these sites, and parents or guardians may pick up meals for students. The student does not need to be present.
  • Adults delivering to non-family members in the community and requiring more than 10 meals should:
    • have agency identification, OR
    • be SPS staff, OR
    • have evidence that SPS can vouch for them.

Meals by Bus

Seattle Public Schools provides student meals by bus Monday through Friday throughout Seattle. Please refer to the online bus route maps and schedules, which can be found here.

If you have questions about the SPS summer meals program, please call 206-252-0900 or visit the SPS Student Meals website.

Renton School District

Renton School District will serve grab & go breakfast and lunch meals on Mondays and Wednesdays from 11 a.m. to noon at locations listed here.  Monday’s service will have meals for Monday and Tuesday, Wednesday’s service will provide meals for Wed-Fri. The summer program will run through August 21.

Please pre-order your meals for your pick-up location here.

Additional information:

  • Meals are free, no ID or income verification required.
  • Child does not need to be present to pick-up meals.
  • Students or families can pick up meals at any school or location nearest them. (You don’t have to go to your school.)
  • Boxes or bags will be provided to make it easier for families to carry multiple-day meal packs. Families are also encouraged to bring a backpack or bag to comfortably carry 2-3 days of meals.

Visit the Renton School District’s Students and Families website for more information.

Food and Meal Assistance in our Community

Person holding box full of food. Broccoli, carrots, and lettuce and two brown paper bags are visible in the box.

Below is an informal list of free food and meal assistance programs in our community. This list is not exhaustive, and you can request to add or change program information on this list as posted in this e-newsletter on my website by sending an e-mail to nicole.herrera@leg.wa.gov.

For a map with more Seattle area food resources, visit the City of Seattle’s map here.

 

Rainier Beach Farm Stand

Rainier Beach Community Center, 8825 Rainier Ave S, Seattle, WA  98118

Produce distribution: June 27th through September 26th on Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

 

God Is

9254 57th Avenue South, 98118; 206-850-8213

Food distribution: Thursdays and Saturdays, 12 to 2 p.m.

Please bring your own bag.

 

The following program information was found here and can be confirmed by calling the individual organizations.

 

 Food Lifeline

815 S 96th St, Seattle, WA  98108; 1-877-404-7543 or 206-545-6600

Distribution of emergency food boxes: Click here for dates, times and locations.

 

 Maranatha Church / LifeChange

7132 43rd Ave, Seattle, WA  98118; 256-684-7037

Food Box Distribution: Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Home delivery available.

 

International Drop-In Center Meal Program

7301 Beacon Ave S, Seattle, WA 98108, 206-414-4263

Home delivery only, call for information.

 

Rainier Valley Food Bank

4205 Rainier Ave. S, Seattle, WA  98118; 206-723-4105

Food delivery is available regardless of age, health, or income. Sign up for home delivery here.

 

El Centro de La Raza

2524 16th Ave S, Seattle, WA  98144; 206-973-4401

Food Bank Window Distribution: Thursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m.

Food Bank Deliveries (for seniors and mobility-limited individuals): Wednesdays, 2 to 5 p.m.

Senior Nutrition and Wellness Program (ages 55 and up): Monday through Friday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

 

The Food Bank at St. Mary’s

611 20th Ave S, Seattle, WA  98144; 206-324-7100

Food Bank Hours: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

 

Seattle Indian Center

1265 Main St Suite 105, Seattle, WA  98144; 206-329-8700

Food Bank Hours: Tuesday and Thursday, 1 to 3 p.m.

Community Meals Program (to go): Monday through Friday, 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. (breakfast) and 12 to 1 p.m. (lunch)

 

Byrd Barr Place

722 18th Ave, Seattle, WA  98122; 206-812-4994

Food Bank Hours: Tuesdays, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Wednesdays, 12 to 4 p.m.; Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

 

YWCA Central Area Food Bank

2820 Cherry St., Seattle, WA 98122; 206-375-1496

Home delivery only, call for more information or visit this website.

 

Jewish Family Service

1601 16th Ave, Seattle, WA  98122; 206-861-3165

Food Bank Hours: Wednesdays and Fridays, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and Thursdays, 2 to 4 p.m.

 

Community Lunch on Capitol Hill

206-972-2524

Call to confirm location, or visit www.communitylunch.org

Hours for meals to go: Tuesdays and Fridays, 12 to 1 p.m.; Wednesdays and Thursdays, 5 to 6 p.m.

 

Salvation Army – Capitol Hill

1101 Pike St, Seattle, WA  98101; 206-442-8371

Call for distribution days and times.

 

ACRS Meal Service

919 S King St, Seattle, WA  98104; 206-774-2420

Home delivery by appointment only.

 

Lazarus Center

2329 Rainier Ave S, Seattle, WA 98144; 253-335-1930

Distributing meals to go, 24 hours a day.

 

Emergency Feeding Program

851 Houser Way N, Suite A, Renton, WA  98057; 425-277-0300

Drive-thru and walk-up food distribution: For distribution dates, times and locations, call or visit www.emergencyfeeding.org

Food bag distribution (seniors, disabled community and social services only): Request bag pick-ups at www.emergencyfeeding.org/bagprogram

 

Salvation Army – Renton

206 S Tobin St, Renton, WA  98057; 425-255-5969

Food Bank: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 9 to 11:30 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m.

Community Supper To-Go: Monday through Thursday, 5:30 – 6 p.m.

 

My office welcomes your thoughts and concerns, so please feel free to reach out and let us know what issues are important to you and your community.

Sincerely,

Sen. Rebecca Saldaña

Contact Information

Facebook Logo

Saldaña supports juvenile sentencing reform

August 7th, 2019|

August 7, 2019

I have been heartened by the commitment of state legislators, criminal justice practitioners, and law enforcement to update our laws and our system of policies, practices, and procedures to take into account the 2012 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Miller v. Alabama. At a recent work session held in the Senate Human Services, Reentry and Rehabilitation Committee, we learned about the Board’s the outcomes and implementation of the 2014 “Miller fix” law in Washington State.

Before the Miller fix, juveniles convicted as adults of aggravated murder received mandatory life sentences without parole. Under the fix, children under 16 at the time of their crime receive a sentence of 25 years to life, and are given an opportunity for release after they have served 25 years. In 2018, the State Supreme Court ruled that trial courts also cannot sentence 16- and 17-year-old youths to life without parole.

Legislation and Supreme Court decisions happen, but the implementation of justice happens one hearing at a time. One of those hearings is happening today at the Indeterminate Sentence Review Board. Below is my letter in support of an individual who was sentenced as a youth prior to the Miller fix.

  • Governor Inslee Signs SB 5718
    Permalink Governor Inslee Signs SB 5718Gallery

    Governor approves measures to accelerate family reunification

Governor approves measures to accelerate family reunification

May 9th, 2019|

OLYMPIA – A law approved by Gov. Jay Inslee today establishes a child welfare housing assistance program to shorten the time that children remain in out-of-home care.

Senate Bill 5718, sponsored by Sen. Rebecca Saldaña (D-Seattle), creates a Department of Children, Youth and Families (DCYF) pilot program to provide housing assistance to parents whose lack of appropriate housing is the primary barrier to reunification with a child who has been removed from their care.  

“We heard of situations where children were staying in foster care for months because their parents lacked appropriate housing,” said Laurie Lippold, Public Policy Director at Partners for Our Children.  “This adds to the trauma children have already experienced and places an unnecessary financial burden on the state.  We need to do everything we can to safely reunify children with their parents and minimize the negative impact being separated can have.”

“We know that, whenever possible, keeping families together is best for kids,” said Saldaña. “But when they have to be separated, safely reuniting kids with their families becomes the top priority. Doing this sooner cuts down on the adverse impacts of separation on children’s health.”

It is not uncommon, however, for parents to lose their housing assistance when their children are removed. That can lead to unstable housing situations and in some cases, homelessness. In far too many cases, parents who have addressed the issues necessary to have their children returned home are then unable to find appropriate, affordable housing. The result is lengthier stays for children in out-of-home care.

DCYF will consult with a stakeholder group made up of parent allies, parent attorneys and social workers, housing organizations, behavioral health providers and others to determine the pilot program’s details, such as eligibility requirements and equitable distribution.

  • Photo Credit: Boxed Water is Better on Unsplash
    Permalink Photo Credit: Boxed Water is Better on UnsplashGallery

    House passes Saldaña bill to reunify children and families faster

House passes Saldaña bill to reunify children and families faster

April 12th, 2019|

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE — April 12, 2019

OLYMPIA – Yesterday the House passed legislation on an overwhelming 92-5 vote to shorten the time that children remain in out-of-home care by establishing a child welfare housing assistance program.

Senate Bill 5718, sponsored by Sen. Rebecca Saldaña (D-Seattle), creates a Department of Children, Youth, and Families (DCYF) pilot program to provide housing assistance to parents whose lack of appropriate housing is the primary barrier to reunification with a child who has been removed from their care.  

“We know that when possible, keeping families together is best for kids,” said Saldaña.  “But when they have to be separated, reuniting kids with their families sooner reduces the adverse impacts of separation on kids’ health.”

“We heard of situations where children were staying in foster care for months because their parents lacked appropriate housing,” said Laurie Lippold, Public Policy Director at Partners for Our Children.  “This adds to the trauma children have already experienced and places an unnecessary financial burden on the state.  We need to do everything we can to safely reunify children with their parents and minimize the negative impact being separated can have.”

Keeping families together is the first priority; however, when this isn’t possible, safely reunifying parents and children who have been placed in out of home care becomes the number one goal.

It is not uncommon, however, for parents to lose their housing assistance when their children are removed.  That can lead to unstable housing situations and in some cases, homelessness.  Parents generally have a number of issues to address in order to have their children returned home, and in far too many cases the inability to find appropriate, affordable housing leads to lengthier stays for children in out-of-home care.

Under this legislation, DCYF would consult with a stakeholder group made up of parent allies, parent attorneys and social workers, housing organizations, behavioral health providers, and others, to determine the program’s details, such as eligibility requirements and equitable distribution.

Having been amended by the House, the bill now returns to the Senate for a concurrence vote.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Senate unanimously passes legislation to help human trafficking victims

Senate unanimously passes legislation to help human trafficking victims

March 7th, 2019|

OLYMPIA – The Senate unanimously passed legislation today to provide public assistance to certain victims of human trafficking by expanding eligibility for state food assistance, family assistance, and medical care services programs.

Under Senate Bill 5164, sponsored by Sen. Rebecca Saldaña (D-Seattle), noncitizens would be able to access these programs if they have taken steps to obtain status under federal laws that protect victims of human trafficking and serious crimes. Qualifying family members would also be eligible for assistance.

“While we would like to think human trafficking does not exist in our state, it does. Trafficked women, men, and children seeking to free themselves often face losing their housing and employment, which is tied up with their trafficker,” said Saldaña. “This legislation removes the barriers to critical life-saving services when people are in their most vulnerable moment and most need them.  I am proud to have worked with API-CHAYA, Seattle Against Slavery, and Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence, who are the frontline leaders in eliminating trafficking in Washington State.”

This legislation builds on a law that passed in the 2018 legislative session, HB 1022, which addressed law enforcement agency certifications for noncitizens who qualify for visas for victims of human trafficking and other serious crimes. SB 5164 gives victims access to services while they are in the process of obtaining visas.

The bill now moves to the House for consideration.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Senate votes to prohibit citizenship/immigration status discrimination

Senate votes to prohibit citizenship/immigration status discrimination

February 26th, 2019|

OLYMPIA – The Washington Senate today voted 29-20 to prohibit discrimination based on citizenship or immigration status.

Senate Bill 5165, sponsored by Sen. Rebecca Saldaña (D-Seattle), adds citizenship or immigration status to the list of characteristics protected by Washington’s Law against Discrimination. The change prohibits discrimination based on citizenship or immigration status unless a distinction or differential treatment is required by a state or federal law, regulation, or government contract.

This type of discrimination is experienced by documented and undocumented immigrants alike, including people living and working in Washington with authorization. This bill protects anyone perceived to be a noncitizen, regardless of their actual immigration status, and would help prevent discrimination in various settings such as education, housing, public accommodations and employment.

“We’re hearing from communities that people are not at ease; they live in fear and sometimes are even afraid to bring their kids to school,” said Saldaña. “By clarifying our law against discrimination, we hope people will feel more secure participating fully in their communities.”

The bill will now be considered in the House of Representatives.

Update from Olympia

February 25th, 2019|

Olympia, February 22, 2019

Dear Neighbors,

We hit the ground running this legislative session to advance our district priorities around homelessness and housing affordability, social justice for immigrants, youth, and workers, and healthy and safe communities.  This Friday is cut off for policy bills to be heard in committee. A huge highlight from last week: My Senate colleagues and I passed Senate Bill 5339, which would end the use of the death penalty in Washington State.  In October, the Washington State Supreme Court ruled that the death penalty as it was being applied in our state was unconstitutional because it was “imposed in an arbitrary and racially biased manner.”  This important bill will bring our state’s laws into compliance with the Constitution.

Protections for Workers and Immigrants

This year I’ve sponsored some critical legislation in response to the needs of Washington’s workers:

  • Senate Bill 5156 would add citizenship or immigration status to the list of characteristics protected by Washington’s Law against Discrimination. This will help prevent landlords from refusing to rent to families for no valid reason, and provide a path to recourse for renters who are taken advantage of because of their immigration status. It will also prevent discrimination in other settings, such as real estate transactions, public accommodations, and employment.
  •  Senate Bill 5693 addresses human trafficking and related employment violations by requiring transparency in agricultural supply chains. This bill focuses on the largest corporate sellers and end users—those with annual gross receipts of over $200 million. Consumers have a right to know whether a company they purchase from is following through on its commitment to product integrity.
  • Senate Bill 5717 provides protections for workers, such as requiring employers to give workers 14 days’ notice of their work schedules and to grant worker requests for schedule changes under certain conditions. It would also require employers to offer more hours to existing workers before hiring more employees.
  • Senate Bill 5846 creates pathways for international medical graduates who live in Washington to help us address our shortage of culturally competent and bilingual medical professionals and improve public health .

Coming Up

The Senate State Government Committee will soon hear the Washington State Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Act, also known as I-1000. This initiative submitted to the government by the people of Washington seeks to guarantee fairness and equality, eliminate discrimination, and establish a governor’s commission on diversity, equity and inclusion.

Meet My Staff

As we enter the next phase of this legislative session, I will continue to work hard on behalf of our state’s working families.  My efforts could not be possible without the help of my amazing staff!

Ayla Kadah, Legislative Aide

Ayla Kadah is a proud Syrian, Muslim, Arab-American woman. Her deep-rooted passion for racial, economic, and social justice stems from her early organizing days in her hometown of Damascus, Syria – particularly around causes like poverty alleviation, education for children with disabilities, and support for victims of war. After moving to the US to attend the University of Washington — where she graduated with degrees in Psychology and Political Communication — Ayla expanded her skills into the realm of grassroots political organizing, particularly for immigration reform and refugee resettlement. In 2016, she served as an elected National Delegate to the Democratic National Convention. Through working for two women of color and activists-turned-elected officials, she was able to witness firsthand the power of activism in the legislative process. She hopes to one day write laws that bend the arc of the moral universe towards justice, and to help build a pipeline that elevates historically underrepresented communities into government spaces.

Joyce Bruce, Session Aide

Joyce is a Seattle native, born and raised in the 37th District. She is an alum of the University Of Washington and Seattle University School of Law. Prior to working in the Washington State Senate, she worked in regulatory compliance and externed at the state Department of Financial Institutions. She hopes to use her background and legal knowledge to make policy that will correct unjust laws that disproportionately impact under-served communities. In her free time she enjoys traveling, spending time with family, and empowering youth through mentorship.

David Pham, Intern

Born and raised in the district, David is the first child in his family to attend college after his parents emigrated from Vietnam in the late 1980s. David currently attends the University of Washington in Seattle studying Political Science and plans to pursue law school and becoming a public defender. Prior to working in Sen. Saldaña’s office, David interned for the City of Seattle in the Legislative Department and worked in the Seattle Public Libraries as a library associate. He is passionate about empowering and mentoring students in underrepresented communities. In his free time, he loves to spend his time hiking, camping and traveling.

Stay in Touch!

Thank you for contacting us on what matters to you. Your participation is making a difference and helping to improve our communities! Follow my official Facebook page for updates and remember to stay in touch by calling or emailing my office.

To subscribe to Sen. Saldaña’s E-Newsletter, click here.

For alerts about specific issues, click here.

Saldaña bill honors civil rights activist Dolores Huerta

February 15th, 2019|

OLYMPIA – The Senate State Government will hear testimony today at 1:30 p.m. on legislation to recognize April 10 as Dolores Huerta Day.

Dolores Huerta, a feminist, civil rights activist and labor leader, co-founded the National Farm Workers Association and was instrumental in California’s adoption of the California Agricultural Labor Relations Act of 1975, which granted farmworkers collective bargaining rights.

Senate Bill 5868 is one of two bills sponsored by Sen. Rebecca Saldaña (D-Seattle) that focus on farmworkers’ concerns. The other bill, Senate Bill 5693, addresses human trafficking and related employment violations by requiring transparency in agricultural supply chains. (Watch the hearing here.)

“Consumers in our state who want to buy products that reflect their values have a right to know whether a company they purchase from is following through on its commitment to production integrity,” Saldaña said.

SB 5693 focuses on the largest corporate sellers and end users, including those who claim to have responsible standards for their suppliers. The bill would increase transparency and accountability for retail sellers and manufacturers of agricultural products with annual gross receipts of $100 million or more.

The companies would be required to obtain reports from suppliers about violations of employment laws including human trafficking, sexual harassment, or labor violations, and to disclose the information annually and post it on their company websites.

The bill is scheduled for executive session in the Senate Labor & Commerce Committee next Thursday.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Sen. Saldaña to play key role in housing affordability, transportation

Sen. Saldaña to play key role in housing affordability, transportation

December 5th, 2018|

RENTON – Sen. Rebecca Saldaña (D-Seattle) said that she is looking forward to addressing housing affordability and transportation issues as one the Senate Democrats’ new deputy leaders.

Saldaña, who Senate Democrats chose to be part of the most diverse leadership team in the history of the Washington State Legislature, will join the newly created Senate Housing Stability & Affordability Committee when lawmakers return to Olympia in January for the 2019 legislative session.

She also will continue to serve as vice chair of the Senate Transportation Committee and as a member of the Senate Labor & Commerce Committee.

“Addressing housing and transportation is core to quality of life and access to economic prosperity, not only to my district but across Washington State,” Saldaña said. “We can’t do well unless we all do well, and we can’t solve housing affordability without work at the regional and state levels to make sure that Washington works for everyone. I’m excited to serve on these committees and in a leadership role. It’s an honor to get to work to deliver solutions for Washington residents.”

Sen. Saldaña Seeking 2019 Session Aides

November 29th, 2018|

Sen. Rebecca Saldaña is currently accepting applications for session aides for the 2019 legislative session, which begins in January.

Session aides provide a variety of support services to help senators and their legislative assistants successfully fulfill the obligations of the senators’ elected position.

We are looking for highly motivated individuals interested in public service who enjoy working in a fast-paced environment.

If you would like to serve as Sen. Saldaña’s session aide and you are committed to upholding the values of justice, dignity and inclusion for all, take a look at the job announcement for more information about the position and how to apply.

The Washington State Senate is an equal opportunity employer. We strive to create a working environment that includes and respects cultural, racial, ethnic, sexual orientation and gender identity diversity. Women, racial and ethnic minorities, persons with disabilities, persons over 40 years of age, disabled and Vietnam era veterans and people of all sexual orientations and gender identities are encouraged to apply. Persons needing accommodation in the application process or this announcement in an alternative format may contact Sen. Saldaña’s office at (360) 786-7688.