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    Coffee hours in Bremerton, Port Orchard, Gig Harbor and on Key Peninsula

Coffee hours in Bremerton, Port Orchard, Gig Harbor and on Key Peninsula

Sen. Emily Randall will host coffee hours around the 26th Legislative District on Mondays during the summer and fall.

“The meetings are a time for neighbors to come to me with questions, concerns, or ideas for how we can work together to build a better 26th District,” Randall said.

Randall will hold the meetings regularly on a rotating basis, on Mondays from 4-6 p.m. The next meetings will be:

  • 1st Mondays in Port Orchard at Whiskey Gulch CoffeePub, 2065 Bay St – upcoming on November 4
  • 2nd Mondays in Gig Harbor at Kimball Coffeehouse, 6659 Kimball Drive, Suite A102 – upcoming on November 11
  • 3rd Mondays on the Key Peninsula – NOTE: cancelled due to Senate Committee Assembly Days
  • 4th Mondays in Bremerton at Kitsap Regional Library, Bremerton, 612 5th St – upcoming on  November 25

For more information, see facebook.com/senatoremilyrandall/events/ or call Sen. Randall’s district office at (360) 627-7610.

May 31st, 2019|Uncategorized|
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    E-News – Applications, financial aid, and all things higher ed

E-News – Applications, financial aid, and all things higher ed

Friends, neighbors—

ICYMI (in case you missed it!): Having served as Acting Chair of Higher Education and Workforce Development for most of this interim, I received the unanimous support of my caucus to officially chair the (best!) committee next session. It will be official official when the full Senate votes on January 13th, but I haven’t wasted a minute getting to work.

Over the spring, summer, and fall I have visited 19 campuses in our incredible higher education system — from community and technical colleges to big state universities and independent colleges. Each visit has been a blast! I’ve focused on meeting passionate students doing ground-breaking work, and talking with faculty and staff about the cutting-edge educational opportunities they offer. Our higher education system is preparing tomorrow’s engineers, teachers and health care providers, electricians and welders, sculptors and builders, activists and legislators, ministers and CEOs — as well as the thought leaders who will work in careers we haven’t yet considered.

On every campus visit, and in so many other conversations this interim, one thing has been on my mind: higher education doesn’t do someone much good if they don’t know how to pay for it. Because I was the first in my family to graduate from college, I know how daunting and inaccessible the system of higher education may seem. That’s why I’m devoting this newsletter to the resources that may help you or the young student in your life considering postsecondary education.

In the time that has passed since I was a high school student seeking scholarships, the Washington State Legislature has made significant investments in creating more pathways to prepare and access higher education opportunities — including the 2019 session’s landmark Workforce Education Investment Act which created the Washington College Grant (more on that below!).

These opportunities can be hard to navigate —  especially if you’re a #firstgen student, a single mom looking to re-enter the workforce, or someone looking to make a big, bold mid-career shift like my favorite mechanic-turned-doctor. In Washington, very few high school students — much less adults on the fence about enrolling in college — even complete the FAFSA or WAFSA to know if they qualify for financial aid.

I hope this newsletter is helpful for you, or for the folks in your life contemplating college. Please feel free to share it with a neighbor, and reach out to my office with questions!

 

randall - higher ed 2

 

#1: In middle school, enroll in the College Bound Scholarship Program (if eligible).

Seventh and eighth grade students in low-income households or in foster care can apply for the College Bound Scholarship. They must apply by the end of their eighth grade year, commit to graduate from high school with a GPA of at least 2.0, and have no felony convictions. This four-year scholarship covers tuition at public college rates, books, and certain fees at more than 60 eligible institutions in Washington State. For more information, visit: https://readysetgrad.wa.gov/college/college-bound-scholarship-program.

#2: In high school, enroll in dual-credit courses.

Dual-credit courses allow you to take college-level courses while you are in high school, with free or low-cost tuition for college credit. Dual-credit opportunities offered by Bremerton School DistrictPeninsula School District, and South Kitsap School District include:

  • Advanced Placement (AP)
  • International Baccalaureate (IB)
  • College in the High School
  • Tech Prep/Career & Technical Education (CTE)
  • Running Start

For more information, visit: https://www.k12.wa.us/student-success/support-programs/dual-credit-programs.

#3: Apply for need-based state scholarships/grants.

Applying for most state-funded scholarships and grants is usually as easy as completing your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) or the Washington Application for State Financial Aid (WASFA) if you aren’t eligible for federal aid due to your immigration status. Always follow up with the financial aid office at the school you’re planning to attend.

  • Washington College Grant: This year the Legislature replaced the State Need Grant with the Washington College Grant, making more families eligible for assistance in paying for education and training beyond high school while also including more higher education programs across the state. This grant provides financial aid to income-eligible students to study at eligible institutions, which include all public and some private colleges, universities, and career training schools statewide. The amount of funds a student will receive will depend on income, family size, and the school or program attended. For more information, visit: https://readysetgrad.wa.gov/college/washington-college-grant.
  • Opportunity Grant: The Opportunity Grant helps low-income adults at community colleges or technical schools earn 45 credits, receive a credential, and increase job skills and knowledge. Eligible students on approved career pathways may receive funds to cover tuition and fees up to 45 credits, as well as an allowance for books and supplies, and individual support services that can include tutoring, career advising, college success education, emergency child care and more. For more information, visit the website of the community college or technical school you plan to attend.
  • Washington State Opportunity Scholarship: The Washington State Opportunity Scholarship is offered to eligible low- and middle-income students in Washington pursuing either: a bachelor’s degree in a STEM or health care field, or a certificate or degree in a high-demand trade, STEM or health care field. These funds can be used to cover tuition and fees, or other costs like transportation, housing, food, and more. For eligibility requirements and more information, visit: https://www.waopportunityscholarship.org/students/applicants/.

#4: Look into other scholarship opportunities.

#5: Obtain a State Work Study position.

Qualifying students from low- and middle- income households can get approved for on-campus or off-campus jobs to support higher education. Work study can build your skills, increase your earnings and reduce your reliance on student loans.

#6: Financial Aid for DREAMers and Other Undocumented Residents

State law allows undocumented, noncitizen residents who cannot complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) due to their immigration status to instead apply for state financial aid through the Washington Application for State Financial Aid (WASFA). Some benefits you could be eligible for include in-state tuition rates, the Washington College Grant, and the College Bound Scholarship. Students who have DACA status (expired or unexpired) may be eligible for other state financial aid as well.

 

randall - higher ed

 

Community Coffee Hours

There are only a couple of our 1st Monday coffee hours left in 2019! Please join me at Whiskey Gulch in Port Orchard next Monday 11/4Kimball Coffee in Gig Harbor on Monday 11/11, and the Kitsap Regional Library in Bremerton on 11/25. We will not have one in Key Peninsula on 11/18 due to Senate Committee Assembly that week.

My week in service

I believe in transparency, and I want to keep you all informed about what I’m doing on behalf of the 26th District in Olympia. During session I made a practice of posting my legislative calendar each week on my Facebook page.

Keep in touch

I’m eager to hear from you about your priorities. I hope you’ll follow me on Facebook so you can see what my team and I are up to. And please feel free to reach out anytime at (360) 627-7610 or Emily.Randall@leg.wa.gov. The more we hear from you, the better our work in Olympia can reflect our shared values and goals.

All my best,

Signature

November 1st, 2019|E-News|

Randall voted Chair of Senate Higher Education Committee

BREMERTON – Sen. Emily Randall (D-Bremerton) has been chosen to chair the Senate Higher Education & Workforce Development Committee.

“I’m honored to have the trust of my colleagues to lead our efforts to make higher education more affordable and accessible to all Washingtonians,” said Randall. “As the first in my family to graduate from college, I know firsthand what higher education can do to open up a world of possibilities.”

Randall previously served as vice chair of the committee. Under her tenure, the Legislature passed the Workforce Education Investment Act, which dramatically increased foundational support for community and technical colleges and created the Washington College Grant Program, a statewide guaranteed free college program serving up to 110,000 low-income students.

The Legislature also passed a bill sponsored by Randall, Senate Bill 5800, which establishes pilot programs at four colleges across the state, two on each side of the Cascades, to provide assistance to homeless students and students who were in foster care.

“As a state, we’ve taken important steps to support young students experiencing homelessness while in our K-12 system, but once they get to college, they lose that network,” Randall said. “This bill will help connect students to services, and it will allow us to collect data to inform our future efforts.”  

As acting chair of the Senate Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee, Randall has spent the interim touring colleges and universities around the state to check on innovative new programs they are implementing. “We’re working to provide opportunities for all students, regardless of their zip code or family income,” said Randall.

Randall’s selection as chair will be formalized in a vote of the full Senate on the first day of the 2020 legislative session.

October 8th, 2019|Uncategorized|

E-News – Health care progress report

Friends, neighbors—

Across the country, our health care is endangered by recklessness and greed. But here in Washington, we can — and we will — continue leading the country in expanding access to the care that folks need.

This year, we took historic steps to expand access to health care—to address the urgent problems with our system now and to make our system better in the long term.

  • The Reproductive Health Access for All Act, which I sponsored, prohibited health care discrimination based on gender identity, expanded reproductive health access for our transgender neighbors, extended care to college students who have suffered sexual assault, and put more muscle behind HIV education outreach.
  • The new Cascade Care program will provide the nation’s first public option. It will be available to all Washingtonians who aren’t covered by an employer, and it will decrease the cost of premiums, copays, and out-of-pocket expenses on the individual insurance market.
  • The Universal Healthcare Workgroup we funded this session will form a plan to ensure that every Washingtonian has the care they need. We have a strong history in our state of leading the nation on health care expansion. And I’m excited about where we’re headed together.
  • The Long-Term Care Trust Act is the first statewide long-term care insurance system in the nation. It will help prevent thousands of working and middle-class families from having to spend down their savings to pay for their care. This is all about building a safe and stable future for all Washingtonians!

Our work is not done, but I’m in it for the long haul. We won’t go back.

Calling all college students!

Applications for the 2020 session intern program are open! It’s a great opportunity to learn about our government at work and get hands-on experience with the legislative process. Junior and senior students in any major can apply, and interns receive a cost-of-living stipend to help make this more accessible.  You can read more and find the application here.

Sen. Randall and Kenzie Taylor
We appreciated the work of my wonderful intern in the 2019 session, Kenzie Taylor!

Around the 26th 

I hope you can join me at one of my coffee hours around the district: 1st Mondays in Port Orchard (moved to the 5th Monday this month due to Labor Day), 2nd Mondays in Gig Harbor, 3rd Mondays on the Key Peninsula, and 4th Mondays in Bremerton. You can see the details about the upcoming schedule on my website or Facebook.

On September 9, the Gig Harbor coffee hour will be one hour shorter than usual so that we can attend the groundbreaking for the new Splash Pad at Gateway Park! See more info here.

My week in service

I believe in transparency, and I want to keep you all informed about what I’m doing on behalf of the 26th District in Olympia. That’s why I’m making a practice of posting my legislative calendar each week on Facebook. You can see this week’s here.

Keep in touch

I’m eager to hear from you about your priorities. I hope you’ll follow me on Facebook so you can see what my team and I are up to. And please feel free to reach out anytime at (360) 627-7610 or Emily.Randall@leg.wa.gov. The more we hear from you, the better our work in Olympia can reflect our shared values and goals.

All my best,

Signature
September 5th, 2019|Uncategorized|

E-News – So that all may play – or work!

Friends, neighbors—

Those of you who know me know that I’m passionate about expanding access to ALL in our communities, especially folks with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

I’m proud of the progress we made this year. We barred state agencies from paying less than minimum wage, increased the rate of pay for community respite providers, expanded social and emotional learning, and increased the special education funding multiplier.

But there’s more to do. Right now, Washington is 41st in the nation in investment in our developmentally disabled community. There are 14,000 Washingtonians who qualify for DD services who can’t access them because of lack of funding. We have a complex system that’s hard for families to navigate, and we need to fix that. To that end we brought together a group of parents, self-advocates, organizations, and agencies to talk through challenges and work on potential solutions.

More to come soon on that path forward! In the meantime, I wanted to share two great success stories from our community.

The playground at Evergreen Rotary Park in Bremerton was the dream of a group of moms who called themselves Beyond Accessible. They knew that the bare minimum of ADA accessibility for playgrounds still excluded many kids who had greater needs. And they worked for years to garner support from the community, the city, and the state.

Now on a beautiful summer day, you can see kids of all abilities running or wheeling across the turf, learning at the Braille clock, or playing in any of a million creative ways in this rich, stimulating environment. It’s truly a place where ALL may play.

Second, supported employment programs are making great job matches, and recently, I got to see the tremendous work that Trillium Employment Services is doing in Kitsap County — with employer partners like Silverdale Beach Hotel, Hops n Drops, and Whiskey Gulch CoffeePub.

So many individuals with I/DD have heard over and over what they can’t do, when the reality is that there is a world of possibilities out there just waiting to be discovered.

Around the 26th

I hope you can join me at one of my coffee hours around the district: 1st Mondays in Port Orchard, 2nd Mondays in Gig Harbor, 3rd Mondays on the Key Peninsula, and 4th Mondays in Bremerton. You can see the details about the upcoming schedule on my website or Facebook.

My week in service

I believe in transparency, and I want to keep you all informed about what I’m doing on behalf of the 26th District in Olympia. That’s why I’m making a practice of posting my legislative calendar each week on Facebook. You can see this week’s here.

Keep in touch

I’m eager to hear from you about your priorities. I hope you’ll follow me on Facebook so you can see what my team and I are up to. And please feel free to reach out anytime at (360) 627-7610 or Emily.Randall@leg.wa.gov. The more we hear from you, the better our work in Olympia can reflect our shared values and goals.

All my best,

August 16th, 2019|E-News|

LGBTQ Caucus supports gender-nonbinary option for state IDs

The members of the Washington State Legislative LGBTQ caucus wrote the following letter in support of the rule change:

As members of the Washington State Legislative LGBTQ Caucus, we write regarding your proposed rule change to allow Washington residents to choose from three options when getting a state-issued ID: female, male, and X. Last session, we passed a bill establishing the LGBTQ Commission to work with state agencies on issues exactly like this rule change. We strongly support this latest step in the state’s efforts to be more inclusive of all our residents.

While no one additional designation could capture the many realities of gender in cultures today and throughout history, the X serves as a symbol of our state’s commitment to honor the lives of those whose gender identities are nonbinary.

This move will have further practical benefits for gender nonbinary people and for our society. It will create greater consistency with our state birth certificates, which have included a possible X designation since 2018. And it will encourage the private sector to make the practical changes—such as changing forms or reprogramming software to accept more than two genders—that can make a significant difference in the daily lives of LGBTQ Washingtonians. In addition, we applaud the choice to allow self-identification of gender, which will prevent medical certification from being a barrier to choosing X.

We look forward to watching your progress toward adopting this proposal.

Sincerely yours,

Sen. Marko Liias, 21st Legislative District 
Sen. Jamie Pedersen, 43rd Legislative District 
Sen. Emily Randall, 26th Legislative District
Sen. Claire Wilson, 30th Legislative District 
Rep. Beth Doglio, 22nd Legislative District 
Rep. Laurie Jinkins, 27th Legislative District
Rep. Nicole Macri, 43rd Legislative District
Rep. Christine Kilduff, 28th Legislative District

August 13th, 2019|Uncategorized|

E-news – An exciting new position

Friends, neighbors—

What’s my favorite part of my job as a Senator? It’s now, during the interim. Not because I don’t like working for you in Olympia (I do!), but because being in our community full time, staying in close touch with you and all our neighbors in the 26th District reaffirms why I do this work.

Since the end of session I’ve held coffee hours in all four corners of our district, reported on the session to community groups, attended neighborhood events, visited classes from Purdy Elementary to Marcus Whitman Middle School to Olympic College—and so many in between. I’ve served salmon at the Manchester Salmon Bake alongside Congressman Kilmer, marched in several parades, and co-hosted a low tide beach walk at Kopachuck State Park. I can’t imagine a better way to spend the summer!

I’m also honored be serving as Acting Chair of the Higher Education and Workforce Development Committee. This opportunity was certainly unexpected for a first term legislator, but I’m ready. As the first in my family to graduate from college, I know how crucial higher education—whether a certificate or a degree—can be in shaping our future. Now as Acting Chair, I’ve visited our local dynamos, Olympic College and Tacoma Community College, and seen the innovative work they’re doing on workforce preparation and integrating students facing extraordinary barriers, such as homelessness. (Their work is one of the inspirations for my bill SB 5800)

I’ve also led a legislative tour of colleges across our state, including Columbia Basin College, WSU Tri-Cities, and Walla Walla Community College, where I got to meet students learning to install, operate, and maintain wind turbines, our wine-scientists in training, and others who are enrolled in the John Deere Training Program, keeping Washington’s agricultural economy humming.

Soon, these colleges will be getting additional support from the landmark Workforce Education Investment Act that we passed this year, which dramatically increased foundational support for community and technical colleges and created the Washington College Grant Program, a statewide program making college affordable—in some cases free—for low income students. Quite simply, it’s the most generous need-based aid program in the nation.

I’m committed to continuing to learn on the ground about the next generation of cutting-edge educational opportunities and how we can support them!

Around the 26th

I loved the chance to dive into my first legislative session with Kitsap Daily News reporter Bob Smith! We talked about bipartisan cooperation, learning-by-doing alongside other new members, how a fast-paced campaign prepares you for the sprint of legislative session, and getting work done for our neighbors. You can read the full interview here.

This moon snail was a big hit with the kids at a Low Tide Beach Walk at Kopachuck State Park!  Thanks to the staff, biologists, and volunteer naturalists of Harbor WildWatch for introducing us to the fascinating critters in our beautiful natural world. This year, the legislature allocated $1.2 million to Kopachuck to build facilities that will improve access to the beach. I’m proud to support our State Parks!

I also had the chance to tour the Port of Tacoma with the Legislative Rail Caucus! Thanks to Tacoma Rail and The Northwest Seaport Alliance, along with ILWU and SMART-TD, for the tour. We heard about the rail line’s long history, the safety protocol, environmental regulations, and the present and future for trade in our region. Every train that pulls out of their on-dock rail yard takes 300 trucks off the road. More than $75 billion in trade goes through Puget Sound ports each year. That’s good for our economy, for our environment, and for family-wage jobs.

Community Coffee Hours

I hope you can join me at one of my coffee hours around the district: 1st Mondays in Port Orchard, 2nd Mondays in Gig Harbor, 3rd Mondays on the Key Peninsula, and 4th Mondays in Bremerton. You can see the details about the upcoming month’s schedule here.

My week in service

I believe in transparency, and I want to keep you all informed about what I’m doing on behalf of the 26th District in Olympia. During session I made a practice of posting my legislative calendar each week on my Facebook page–after a little vacation, we’re picking the habit back up!

Keep in touch

I’m eager to hear from you about your priorities. I hope you’ll follow me on Facebook so you can see what my team and I are up to. And please feel free to reach out anytime at (360) 627-7610 or Emily.Randall@leg.wa.gov. The more we hear from you, the better our work in Olympia can reflect our shared values and goals.

All my best,

August 2nd, 2019|E-News|

Session Report

Dear friends and neighbors,

Now that we’ve finished the legislative session—with the first on-time budget in a decade—I’m excited to report back to you on what we did and how it will affect our community.

Since I came to Olympia this January, I have made it my mission to fight every day to make the 26th District and our whole state a better place—to expand access to health care, to make it easier for kids to fulfill their dreams through higher education, and to ensure that our community is getting the investments we need and deserve.

Of the bills I introduced this year, five passed into law. These bills impact healthcare, homelessness, road safety, and efficiency in our court system. One bill creates pilot programs at six universities and community and technical colleges around the state to provide assistance to students experiencing homelessness. Another of my bills prohibits discrimination in health care based on gender identity and extends care to college students who suffer from sexual assault. I also cosponsored a property tax exemption for veterans, seniors, and folks with disabilities.

At the same time, I worked hard to make sure the capital construction budget funds $29 million in infrastructure projects in communities across our district. A few highlights include:

• $1 million for the Mustard Seed senior living project on Key Peninsula.
• $4 million for construction at Retsil Washington Veterans Home.
• $1.2 million for new facilities in Kopachuck Beach State Park.
• $2 million for Peninsula Community Health Services to expand its behavioral health offerings and support its new mobile dental clinic.

It is an honor to be your voice in the Legislature. In the coming months, I will be attending events around the district and also holding regular coffee hours. You can see specific times, locations and other details on my official website.

Please don’t hesitate to reach out. The more I hear from you, the better I can ensure that our work in Olympia reflects our shared values.

All my best,

Senator Emily Randall

June 12th, 2019|Uncategorized|

It’s time we covered all Washingtonians

From the Key Peninsula News

When I talk to our neighbors in Lakebay, Lake Holiday and Vaughn, I hear over and over that you are worried about health care costs.

Whether it’s high premiums and deductibles, limited networks that don’t include your family doctors, plans that don’t cover the care you need, family members who are out of work and can’t afford coverage on the individual market, or the nagging worry that you’ll lose your care if you lose your job—it’s hard to avoid the stress caused by our broken system.

I take those concerns to heart because my family has been there.

In 1993, when my sister Olivia was born with microcephaly, we didn’t know how long she’d live—or how we’d pay for the care she needed to stay alive. Even though my dad worked at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and had good health coverage, it wouldn’t come close to covering Olivia’s needs.

When the Legislature expanded Medicaid that same year, we felt a huge burden lifted. We could focus on keeping Olivia healthy and home with us, instead of worrying we’d lose our home. It didn’t solve all our problems, but it did pay for the specialists Olivia saw in Tacoma and Seattle, her many expensive medications, her feeding tube and supplies, her wheelchairs—the care we needed to help her live her fullest, healthiest life. For our family—and for Olivia—Medicaid was a lifesaver.

Ours wasn’t the only family to benefit. After that 1993 expansion, 100,000 more Washingtonians were covered by Medicaid in 1994 than had been in 1992.

We have a lot to be proud of in our state’s history of expanding care. Since 2012, when Washington again expanded Medicaid as part of the Affordable Care Act, 600,000 more people have gained coverage. The uninsured rate in our state decreased from 14 percent to 5.5 percent by 2017.

That’s a huge improvement—changing hundreds of thousands of lives for the better. It means more of us are able to afford checkups, to fill prescriptions for asthma medicine, and to get preventive treatment from our doctors instead of waiting until it’s so bad we have to go to the emergency room.

But we haven’t done enough. There are still nearly half a million Washingtonians without health care coverage. And many families that do have insurance avoid going to the doctor because their premiums and deductibles are so high.

Given the urgency of this problem, I’m supporting immediate action while also working to establish a long-term solution.

Both houses of the Legislature this year have passed a version of our new Cascade Care health plan, which would create a public option for health care coverage. This plan would offer a good benefit package at an affordable price. And it would be available for any Washingtonian to buy into, without affecting those who already have health care through their employers or through Medicare or Medicaid.

This would make good health care more easily accessible and provide some healthy competition for private health care plans.

But just making care more accessible won’t address everyone’s needs. And no family—regardless of their income or financial situation—should go bankrupt or lose their home because they have a child born with special needs, are diagnosed with cancer, or get into a car accident.

That’s why I introduced a Pathway to Universal Health Care this year. This bill isn’t intended just to send a message or to check a box. It’s about taking concrete steps to prepare us for a future where we cover all Washingtonians.

The Pathway bill would bring all the stakeholders into one room—from patients to physicians, health care workers to employers, insurance carriers and hospitals—to hash out a specific plan to provide that coverage. That would put us in position for the next milestone in our proud history of leading the nation in health care coverage: the day we make worries about losing health care a thing of the past.

Sen. Emily Randall, D-Bremerton, represents the 26th Legislative District.

May 1st, 2019|Uncategorized|

E-News – Session report card

Friends, neighbors—

After 105 days, we’ve made it to the finish line! Today we adjourned the legislative session until next year. Since I came to Olympia this January, I have made it my mission to fight every day to make the 26th District and our whole state a better place—to expand access to health care, to make it easier for kids to fulfill their dreams through higher education, and to ensure that our community is getting the investment we deserve from the state.

The Legislature has made great progress on some of the most crucial issues facing our state this year. We’ve made it easier to build affordable housing, protected tenants from eviction, funded expanded wildfire prevention and response, protected our orcas, and improved sentencing guidelines. And we’ve guaranteed the most important protections for health care in the Affordable Care Act, expanded affordable and high-quality health insurance options, provided a way for families to prepare for long-term care, ensured transparency in drug pricing, and given school districts the flexibility to fund enrichment programs.

Closer to home, I’m proud to say that our budgets are funding significant infrastructure investments in our community.

The transportation budget includes $41 million of funding in and around our district over the next two years, including $7.9 million for upkeep of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and $2.5 million for the Bremerton and Southworth ferry terminals.

The capital budget will invest $29 million in projects in our communities, including:

  • $10.1 million for Olympic College’s Innovation & Technology Learning Center and the renovation of the Shop Building
  • $4 million for construction work at the Retsil Washington Veterans Home
  • $3.5 million for West Sound Technical Skill Center Modernization
  • $2.3 million for Minter Hatchery Intakes
  • $2 million for Peninsula Community Health Services Behavioral Expansion and Mobile Dental Clinic
  • $1.2 million for Kopachuck Beach Area Improvements
  • $1 million for the Mustard Seed Project, which promotes independent living for seniors on Key Peninsula
  • $800,000 for McCormick Woods Sewer Lift #2 Improvements
  • $556,000 for Warren Avenue Playfield
  • $500,000 for renovations at Warren Ave. Neighborhood Park
  • $497,800 for Gateway Park
  • $385,000 for Sound View Camp conservation
  • $350,000 for Gig Harbor Sports Complex
  • $250,000 for the YMCA of Greater Seattle Camp Colman
  • $206,000 for Quincy Square on 4th
  • $204,500 for Taylor Bay Acquisition Phase 2
  • $200,000 for environmental cleanup at the Bremerton Naval Complex
  • $173,000 for PenMet Community Rec Center
  • $150,000 for Kaukiki Farmland Preservation
  • $134,000 for Sehmel Homestead Park Turf Lights
  • $100,000 for Harbor History Museum’s fishing vessel Shenandoah
  • $90,000 for fish barrier removal on Minter Creek
  • $83,000 for Tidal Embayment restoration design
  • $52,000 for Howe Farm Water Service
  • $52,000 for PenMet Cushman Trail Enhancements
  • $51,000 for the Roxy Bremerton Foundation

Bills I passed this year

My week in Olympia

I believe in transparency, and I want to keep you all informed about what I’m doing on behalf of the 26th District in Olympia. That’s why I’m making a practice of posting my legislative calendar each week on my Facebook page. This is the final calendar of this year’s legislative session!

Keep in touch

We are all eager to hear from you about your priorities. I hope you’ll follow me on Facebook so you can see what we’re up to. And please feel free to reach out anytime at 360-786-7650 or Emily.Randall@leg.wa.gov. The more we hear from you, the better our work in Olympia can reflect our shared values and goals.

All my best,

April 29th, 2019|E-News|