Monthly Archives: April 2019

E-News – Session report card

April 29th, 2019|

Friends, neighbors—

After 105 days, we’ve made it to the finish line! Today we adjourned the legislative session until next year. Since I came to Olympia this January, I have made it my mission to fight every day to make the 26th District and our whole state a better place—to expand access to health care, to make it easier for kids to fulfill their dreams through higher education, and to ensure that our community is getting the investment we deserve from the state.

The Legislature has made great progress on some of the most crucial issues facing our state this year. We’ve made it easier to build affordable housing, protected tenants from eviction, funded expanded wildfire prevention and response, protected our orcas, and improved sentencing guidelines. And we’ve guaranteed the most important protections for health care in the Affordable Care Act, expanded affordable and high-quality health insurance options, provided a way for families to prepare for long-term care, ensured transparency in drug pricing, and given school districts the flexibility to fund enrichment programs.

Closer to home, I’m proud to say that our budgets are funding significant infrastructure investments in our community.

The transportation budget includes $41 million of funding in and around our district over the next two years, including $7.9 million for upkeep of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and $2.5 million for the Bremerton and Southworth ferry terminals.

The capital budget will invest $29 million in projects in our communities, including:

  • $10.1 million for Olympic College’s Innovation & Technology Learning Center and the renovation of the Shop Building
  • $4 million for construction work at the Retsil Washington Veterans Home
  • $3.5 million for West Sound Technical Skill Center Modernization
  • $2.3 million for Minter Hatchery Intakes
  • $2 million for Peninsula Community Health Services Behavioral Expansion and Mobile Dental Clinic
  • $1.2 million for Kopachuck Beach Area Improvements
  • $1 million for the Mustard Seed Project, which promotes independent living for seniors on Key Peninsula
  • $800,000 for McCormick Woods Sewer Lift #2 Improvements
  • $556,000 for Warren Avenue Playfield
  • $500,000 for renovations at Warren Ave. Neighborhood Park
  • $497,800 for Gateway Park
  • $385,000 for Sound View Camp conservation
  • $350,000 for Gig Harbor Sports Complex
  • $250,000 for the YMCA of Greater Seattle Camp Colman
  • $206,000 for Quincy Square on 4th
  • $204,500 for Taylor Bay Acquisition Phase 2
  • $200,000 for environmental cleanup at the Bremerton Naval Complex
  • $173,000 for PenMet Community Rec Center
  • $150,000 for Kaukiki Farmland Preservation
  • $134,000 for Sehmel Homestead Park Turf Lights
  • $100,000 for Harbor History Museum’s fishing vessel Shenandoah
  • $90,000 for fish barrier removal on Minter Creek
  • $83,000 for Tidal Embayment restoration design
  • $52,000 for Howe Farm Water Service
  • $52,000 for PenMet Cushman Trail Enhancements
  • $51,000 for the Roxy Bremerton Foundation

Bills I passed this year

My week in Olympia

I believe in transparency, and I want to keep you all informed about what I’m doing on behalf of the 26th District in Olympia. That’s why I’m making a practice of posting my legislative calendar each week on my Facebook page. This is the final calendar of this year’s legislative session!

Keep in touch

We are all eager to hear from you about your priorities. I hope you’ll follow me on Facebook so you can see what we’re up to. And please feel free to reach out anytime at 360-786-7650 or Emily.Randall@leg.wa.gov. The more we hear from you, the better our work in Olympia can reflect our shared values and goals.

All my best,

E-News – Leading the nation

April 13th, 2019|

Friends, neighbors—

As the cherry trees bloom in Olympia, we are in the thick of floor action: all bills must have passed both houses by next Wednesday at 5 p.m. That means we’re on the floor of the Senate all day every day taking votes on bills that have come over to us from the House. We’ve passed bills that will make a difference—bills that will strengthen Washington’s hate crimes statues, enhance the safety of domestic violence victims and police officers, end the backlog on the testing of sexual assault kits, and protect patients from surprise bills for out-of-network services.

Opening doors to higher education

As a state, we’ve taken important steps to support young students experiencing homelessness while in our K-12 system, but once they get to college, they lose that network.

That’s why I’m sponsoring SB 5800, which passed the House of Representatives last night. It creates pilot programs at six public colleges across the state, one four-year and two community and technical colleges (CTCs) on each side of the Cascades. Each institution will provide assistance to students experiencing homelessness and students who were in foster care.

As the national publication CityLab recently wrote, this bill makes Washington a leader nationwide—California is the only other state considering similar legislation this year.

The assistance colleges provide will include access to short-term housing or housing assistance; laundry facilities, storage, and showers; reduced-price meal plans; technology; and case management services. And, crucially, these schools will collect data on their students experiencing homelessness and food insecurity so that we can get a full picture of the scale of this problem and keep improving our services.

I’m a strong believer that those closest to the problem are also closest to the solution. The architect of this bill is Charles Adkins, a student at Evergreen State College who had himself been homeless in high school.  And one of the leaders in our state who has helped push for this legislation and has long been making college a welcoming and stable place for students experiencing homelessness is Marty Cavalluzzi, the President of Olympic College (pictured above).

Behind the scenes at our legislature

One of the great privileges of serving in the Legislature is interacting with all the bright and enthusiastic young people who spend time here learning about our democracy.

It was a blast to speak to the pages during page school last week. I told them my public-service origin story—how my sister and the 1993 legislature inspired me to spend my career advocating for health care access for every single one of us, and eventually to take the plunge and run for office.  They shared the projects they’re doing to learn about how our representative government works. I’m confident that some of them will be my colleagues here someday!

I’ve particularly prized the opportunity to hear the stories of the kids from across our district who have served as pages. You can read more about the terrific pages from the last month at the links below!

My week in Olympia

I believe in transparency, and I want to keep you all informed about what I’m doing on behalf of the 26th District in Olympia. That’s why I’m making a practice of posting my legislative calendar each week on my Facebook page.

Keep in touch

We are all eager to hear from you about your priorities. I hope you’ll follow me on Facebook so you can see what we’re up to. And please feel free to reach out anytime at 360-786-7650 or Emily.Randall@leg.wa.gov. The more we hear from you, the better our work in Olympia can reflect our shared values and goals.

All my best,

E-News – What’s in your budget

April 8th, 2019|

Friends, neighbors—

Thanks again to everyone who participated in one of our town hall meetings in Bremerton, Gig Harbor, and Vaughn, or in our telephone town hall meeting this past Wednesday. We had a great discussions about critical issues like the budget, health care, transportation and education, as well as the work I’ve been doing in Olympia for our community.

For anyone who couldn’t make it, you can check out the questions that I’ve answered on my Facebook page, or listen to the highlights of the telephone town hall meeting here.

Thank you all for being so invested in our community and government!

Fighting for your health care and infrastructure in our budget

This week, we passed the operating budget and transportation budget off the Senate floor, and we moved the capital budget through the Senate Ways & Means Committee. During the floor debate on the operating budget, I spoke about what it does to expand access to health care for those who are being left behind in our state. You can see my floor speech here.

I also wanted to share with you some of the infrastructure highlights for our district. You can also see full lists of projects in our district, as well as around the state, at http://fiscal.wa.gov/.

These budgets are not yet final—they still have to go through negotiations with the House. That means there is still work to do to make sure that the final versions includes our priority projects, and I’ll be following the negotiations carefully and fighting on our behalf.

The transportation budget includes $43 million of funding in and around our district over the next two years, including $7.9 million for upkeep of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and $2.5 million for the Bremerton and Southworth ferry terminals. The projects funded in the capital budget include:

  • $1 million for the Mustard Seed Project, which promotes independent living for seniors on the Key Peninsula
  • $800,000 for McCormick Woods Sewer Lift #2 Improvements in Port Orchard
  • $1.7 million for Peninsula Community Health Services Behavioral Expansion
  • $340,000 for Peninsula Community Health Services’ Mobile Dental Clinic 
  • $51,000 from the Building for the Arts Grant Program for the Roxy Bremerton Foundation
  • $250,000 for the YMCA of Greater Seattle Camp Colman
  • $100,000 from the Washington State Historical Society Heritage Grants Program for the Harbor History Museum
  • $4 million for construction work at the Washington Veterans Home
  • $3.5 million for West Sound Technical Skill Center Modernization
  • $200,000 for environmental cleanup at the Bremerton Naval Complex
  • $2.3 million Minter Hatchery Intakes
  • From the Washington Wildlife & Recreation Program –
    • $150,000 for Kaukiki Farmland Preservation
    • $500,000 for renovations at Warren Ave. Neighborhood Park
    • $497,800  for Gateway Park
    • $1,236,000  for Kopachuck Beach Area Improvements      
    • $204,500 for Taylor Bay Acquisition Phase 2             

My week in Olympia

I believe in transparency, and I want to keep you all informed about what I’m doing on behalf of the 26th District in Olympia. That’s why I’m making a practice of posting my legislative calendar each week on my Facebook page.

Keep in touch

We are all eager to hear from you about your priorities. I hope you’ll follow me on Facebook so you can see what we’re up to. And please feel free to reach out anytime at 360-786-7650 or Emily.Randall@leg.wa.gov. The more we hear from you, the better our work in Olympia can reflect our shared values and goals.

All my best,