(360) 786-7608|mark.mullet@leg.wa.gov

Monthly Archives: May 2019

E News – 2019 Session Wrap-Up

May 9th, 2019|

Dear friends and neighbors,

In my last newsletter, I shared information about the operating, construction and transportation budgets that were passed this legislative session. This week, I wanted to give you a final update on the bills that I sponsored that the governor has signed into law.

SB 5278 makes it easier for consumers to report fraudulent use or theft of credit cards, allowing them to take quicker action to protect themselves.

SB 5410 ensures that passing scores on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate and Cambridge International exams receive college credit.

The governor also signed into law a number of other ideas that I championed that were included in bills sponsored by others:

HB 1196 sends a message telling Congress to let Washington and its neighbors stop the annual switch and stay on Daylight Saving Time year-round.

HB 1224 increases transparency to let people know what the prescription drugs that they need and pay for actually cost to make and distribute.

SB 5088, which I co-sponsored, requires all high schools to offer an elective computer science course by 2022.

SB 5334, which I also co-sponsored, encourages the development of condominiums by addressing current barriers to their expanded use as a supply of accessible homeownership opportunities.

I’m proud to have played a lead role in addressing some of the most complex, difficult and important public issues facing our state. I look forward to continuing to fight for our communities throughout this year and in the next legislative session. In the meantime, I welcome your thoughts on how we can best do that.

All my best,

E News – 2019 Budget Update

May 1st, 2019|

Dear friends and neighbors,

We accomplished a lot during this year’s 105-day legislative session. In addition to passing a wide range of bills improving the quality of life in our communities, we finished on time and passed construction, transportation and operating budgets for the next two years.

I’m pleased that both the construction and transportation budgets had bipartisan support and that each one makes a number of significant investments in our communities.

Construction Budget – our infrastructure budget includes:

• $3 million to improve affordable, in-district health care options at the Issaquah Opportunity Center.

• $2 million for Encompass Northwest to build a facility in Snoqualmie to provide pediatric therapy and early learning services.

• $400,000 for a pilot project to clean up firefighting chemicals (PFAS) that have leached into drinking water.

• $412,000 to support the outdoor Snoqualmie Valley Youth Activities Center, which is open to the public.

• $113,000 to update interactive educational exhibits at the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery.

• $102,000 to help construct a new memorial in Maple Valley honoring veterans.

• $200,000 to help make parking improvements at Lake Wilderness Park.

• $154,000 to lay the groundwork to build infrastructure and attract business investment at the legacy site in the heart of Maple Valley.

• $250,000 to strengthen the South Fork Snoqualmie Levee System, to reduce the duration of flooding in North Bend.

• $229,000 for the Northwest Railway Museum in Snoqualmie to restore the last surviving Puget Sound Electric Railway interurban.

Transportation Budget: the budget includes funding to keep the project to build a new interchange at State Route 18 and Interstate 90 on schedule to finish by 2023. It also includes $27 million in new funds to begin the design process to make SR 18 four lanes all the way to Issaquah-Hobart Road – the first phase of that project – in 2023.

Operating Budget: Unfortunately, the operating budget did not enjoy bipartisan support and relied too much on raising taxes. I agreed to raise taxes to support the wide-ranging transportation budget package in 2015, to support light rail in 2016 and to solve the McCleary lawsuit over K-12 education funding in 2017. But this year, it seemed we were raising taxes because we could, not because we needed to. I couldn’t support that, so I had to vote “no.”

Moving forward, a number of my bills and others that advance policies I advocated for are now on Gov. Inslee’s desk awaiting his signature. I’ll have another report on them for you in the coming weeks.

Best regards,