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Monthly Archives: February 2017

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    E News- Students shouldn’t fret about losing their AP credits

E News- Students shouldn’t fret about losing their AP credits

February 22nd, 2017|

Dear friends and neighbors,

This is the time of year when high school students across the state put the finishing touches on their college application packets and begin to research financial aid options. Needless to say, applying to college can be stressful and daunting for both students and their parents.

What shouldn’t be stressful is worrying whether the AP credits students worked hard to earn in high school will be accepted at the colleges they decide to attend.

Right now, each state four-year institution establishes its own requirements when it comes to considering AP coursework completed in high school. A score of three on an AP test might mean you will get credit at one school, while at another school you might need a score of four. This inconsistency and lack of transparency makes it trickier than it should be for students deciding where to go to college.

That’s why I sponsored Senate Bill 5234, which would establish a uniformed minimum score for granting undergraduate course credits to students who have completed AP classes.

By establishing a standard AP requirement for all state colleges, we will make the application process easier to navigate so students can choose the college that best meets their academic needs without the fear of losing their hard-earned AP credits. After all, AP credits save students money in the long run. The more credits they earn in high school, the fewer credits they will have to pay for once they get to college.

Best regards,

E News- A moderate approach to K-12 funding

February 15th, 2017|

Dear friends and neighbors,

On Tuesday, I introduced Senate Bill 5825 that offers a moderate approach to fully funding our schools and resolving the state’s McCleary lawsuit. One of my top priorities this session was to work hard to protect your local investments and find a way to make sure local levies are part of the solution to fully funding our schools. I am confident that my bill does just that.

SB 5825 locks in place local levies at their current rates for every school district. This addresses the Supreme Court’s concern that locals levies are unreliable because they have to be voted on every four years.

Additionally, the bill doubles the amount of funds the state provides to property poor districts, allowing them to adequately compensate teachers – a major sticking point in the McCleary ruling. This is achieved by increasing state levy equalization assistance from $765 million to $1.5 billion per budget cycle.

This plan is a win-win for school districts in both property rich and property poor districts. School districts in wealthier areas will gain additional flexibility to raise money for their local schools with the assurance that their tax dollars stay local. For rural areas, state support will be doubled so they are better able to provide a high-quality learning environment and offer competitive salaries to hire more teachers.

I prefer my proposal to the Republican plan because schools get more money and it costs the state less.

We’ve now seen the Republican proposal and the Democratic proposal; this is the moderate proposal. At the start of negotiations, it’s important to get all ideas on the table. I’m confident that my proposal is a fresh concept that will help bring both sides to the table in a productive and collaborative manner to resolve our K-12 funding crisis.

If you want to learn more about my bill, be sure to click here to read the Seattle Times report on my proposal.

Best regards,

Mullet releases moderate K-12 funding proposal

February 14th, 2017|

OLYMPIA – Sen. Mark Mullet, D- Issaquah, today introduced legislation that offers a moderate approach to fully funding our schools and resolving the state’s McCleary lawsuit.

“We’ve seen the Republican proposal and the Democratic proposal; this is the moderate proposal,” said Mullet. “At the start of negotiations, it’s important to get all ideas on the table. I’m confident that my proposal will encourage other moderates in the Legislature to join the discussion about how we go about funding our K-12 system.”

Senate Bill 5825 locks in place local levies at their current rates for every school district. This addresses the Supreme Court’s concern that locals levies are unreliable because they have to be voted on every four years.

“Every last one of us wants to solve the issue of fully and fairly funding K-12 education,” said Sen. Steve Hobbs, D- Lake Stevens, who is co-sponsoring the bill. “The plan we put forward today is simply another path toward accomplishing that goal. We’ve put out a plan that hopefully leads us to a solution.”

“We already know that any solution the Legislature comes to in addressing the McCleary decision will be a product of compromise from both houses and both parties,” said Sen. Dean Takko, D- Longview, another co-sponsor of SB 5825. “This bill puts a nice, moderate approach on the table right now that will help students in every corner of the state.”

Additionally, the bill doubles the amount of funds the state provides to property poor districts, allowing them to adequately compensate teachers – a major sticking point in the McCleary ruling. This is achieved by increasing state levy equalization assistance from $765 million to $1.5 billion per budget cycle.

“This plan is a win-win for school districts in both property rich and property poor districts,” said Mullet. “School districts in wealthier areas will gain additional flexibility to raise money for their local schools with the assurance that their tax dollars stay local. For rural areas, state support will be doubled so they are better able to provide a high-quality learning environment and offer competitive salaries to hire more teachers.”

Mullet added that he prefers his proposal to the Republican plan because schools get more money and it costs the state less.

E News- Local projects that benefit you

February 8th, 2017|

Dear friends and neighbors,

Often when people think of the work that the Legislature does in Olympia, they think of big budgets, massive transportation projects and complex public policy. In reality, a lot of the work we do flies under the radar.

One of the parts of my job that I value the most is bringing capital projects to our district. These projects might not garner statewide headlines but for local communities they can have a massive impact.

This session, I am working to secure funding in the capital construction budget for a downtown revitalization project for Carnation. This project will create new sidewalks, lighting and other street improvements with the goal of transforming downtown Carnation into a historic tourist attraction and shopping destination. A similar project transformed historic downtown Duvall and boosted its economy dramatically.

I am also fighting for additional funding to replace the old and undersized Black Diamond Elementary School with a new, state-of-the-art building. Right now, more than 40 percent of the school’s students are housed in portable buildings. The construction of a new building would group all students and teachers under one roof in a safe and comfortable learning environment.

These kinds of investments can make a world of difference locally. For small business owners in Carnation, the revitalization of downtown means more foot traffic and better profits. For the kids at Black Diamond Elementary, a better learning environment can help them better pursue their dreams.

Best regards,

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    Tahoma High’s ‘We the People’ team honored by the Senate

Tahoma High’s ‘We the People’ team honored by the Senate

February 1st, 2017|

OLYMPIA- In recognition of their 20th state championship, Tahoma High School’s “We the People” team was honored on Wednesday by the Washington State Senate with a resolution sponsored by Sen. Mark Mullet, D-Issaquah and Sen. Joe Fain, R-Auburn.

“Every time these students visit my office, I am energized by their enthusiasm for civic education,” said Mullet. “Their passion for the subject matter is so impressive.”

In April, the team will represent the state of Washington at the 30th anniversary “We the People” Finals in Washington D.C. In 2016, Tahoma finished ninth in the nation. Tahoma has now advanced teams to the top ten in the nation four times.

“Having previously served as a judge for the We the People competition I continue to be amazed by the students’ depth of knowledge of our constitution,” said Fain. ”Now more than ever we need young people to be civically engaged in order to set an example not only for their peers, but for the entire community.”

“We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution” is a national civics education program that has had more than 28 million student participants since the program’s creation in 1987.

This year’s students honored in the resolution include Zoe Brown, Noah Casey, Jessica Davies, Jonathan Feher, David Ferrer, Jandrea Grobbelaar, Makaila Heifner, Lydia Kropelnicki, Kieran Lowe, Michelle McLoughlin, Rosella Miller, Calista Moore, Taylor Murrey, Cameron Musard, Amber Neathery, Ryan Nelson, Jared Perrine, James Riordan, Peter Seely, Matthew Simmons, Everett Wall, Benjamin Weaver and Tierra Wilson.