Sen. Keiser Newsroom

Sen. Keiser’s 2019 Govt Guide

 

March 4th, 2019|Uncategorized|

Keiser is ready to preside

DES MOINES — Today Sen. Karen Keiser (D-Des Moines), the President Pro Tempore of the Washington State Senate, released the following statement in response to news reports that the Lieutenant Governor is attending seminary in California:

“The Washington State Senate rules provide that, in the absence of the Lieutenant Governor, the President Pro Tempore of the Senate shall preside.

“If called upon, I’m ready and able to preside.”

October 14th, 2020|News Release|

Keiser applauds Paid Family and Medical Leave program for avoiding premium increases and covering more families than expected.

DES MOINES — Upon the publication of the 2021 premium rate for the Paid Family and Medical Leave program, which will stay the same as the 2020 rate, Sen. Karen Keiser (D-Des Moines) released the following statement:

“With the Paid Family and Medical Leave program, the Employment Security Department was given a tall order: stand up an unprecedented program from scratch in a mere two years, provide essential benefits to families at a crucial time in their lives, and continue to do it through the worst recession of the last century.

“I’m proud to say that they have done an excellent job.

“Given the profound effect of the COVID-19 public health crisis on workers and small businesses, keeping the premium flat at 0.4% of gross wages will leave more money in the pockets of Washingtonians while still maintaining the program’s strength.

“The urgent need for paid family and medical leave was demonstrated when the program received 10,000 applications in the first two weeks alone.

“Since that initial flood of applications when the program opened in January 2020, it has delivered more than $375 million in benefits to more than 85,000 Washingtonians, while reducing wait times from 11 weeks to two weeks.

“Washington’s Paid Family and Medical Leave program remains the strongest in the nation, offering 12 weeks of paid family and medical leave per year. That means new mothers and fathers can stay with their infants in those first precious weeks. It means grandparents can depend on their family in times of sickness. It strengthens families and makes our communities more resilient.

“And it will do so next year at no additional cost.”

Washingtonians can find more information about the Paid Family and Medical Leave program at PaidLeave.wa.gov.

October 13th, 2020|News Release|

Update on small business assistance

Dear Neighbors,

As I wrote you last week, our federal, state and local governments are stepping up assistance for people and businesses affected by the pandemic. In addition to the rental, mortgage, and child care assistance that I listed in my previous e-newsletter, they are also offering generous help for small businesses. You can find details described below.

Loans and debt relief

The state Department of Financial Institutions has a website dedicated to the state and federal resources available to small businesses, including emergency loans.

  • Economic Injury Disaster Loan Advance
    This loan advance will provide up to $10,000 of economic relief to businesses that are currently experiencing temporary difficulties that does not have to be repaid. This complements the traditional SBA Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program which has been in place for the entire nation, all territories and Washington, D.C. since mid-March. Approval notification is estimated at approximately three days. The program is currently accepting applications.
  • Paycheck Protection Program
    Primarily for payroll expenses, the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), provided loans for small businesses. The program is not accepting new applications, but is now accepting applications from loan recipients for forgiveness.
  • SBA Debt Relief
    The Small Business Administration (SBA) is providing a financial reprieve to small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic. This covers all principal, interest and fees on current and new SBA 7(a) loans made through Sep. 27, 2020, for up to six months.
  • Express Bridge Loan
    The SBA’s Express Bridge Loan allows small businesses that have an existing business relationship with a participating lender to access up to $25,000 quickly.

Grants

Puget Sound Energy Foundation is providing grants to help businesses impacted by COVID-19 serve and reopen operations. Grant sizes range between $1,000 – $20,000. Next deadlineOctober 1 with awards in December.

Technical assistance coaching

King County offers small businesses technical assistance coaching from a U.S. Treasury Certified Community Development Financial Institution. You can use an online request form through this site, or call 206-331-3275 (Relay 711) and leave your contact information. A coach will call back within two business days for a coaching call, with a language interpreter on the line if requested.

Webinars with up-to-date info, and live Q & A

The state puts on a monthly webinar series presents information specific to Washington small businesses. The series features brief presentations from state and federal agencies and open-mic Q & A time. Topics include unemployment insurance, returning employees to work, PPP and EIDL loans, workplace safety, face covering requirements, and other subjects important to employers.

Stay in Touch

If you’d like to follow what I’m working on, you can like my official legislative Facebook page here.

Please don’t hesitate to stay in touch. Stay safe and take care.

Always,

Senator Karen Keiser
Chair, Senate Labor & Commerce Committee
Senate President Pro Tempore

September 28th, 2020|E-News|

Rental, mortgage, and child care assistance

Dear Neighbors,

As we enter the fall still feeling the effects of the pandemic, state and local governments are stepping up assistance for people in need. If you need emergency help with food, housing, or other services, contact King County Crisis Connections (call 2-1-1 or text your zip code to 877-211-9274). If you are in need of rental or mortgage assistance or child care, or you know someone who is, you can find information below about programs to help. In my next newsletter, I will provide information about assistance for small businesses and nonprofit organizations.

Child Care

For families facing new child care needs during the pandemic, Child Care Aware of Washington operates a free statewide referral line to connect families with vacant child care slots. Call 1-800-446-1114 or contact them here. The Working Connection Child Care program helps lower-income families and working parents pay for child care. When a family qualifies for benefits and selects an eligible child care provider, the state pays a portion of the cost. The City of Seattle also operates a local child care subsidy program for city residents.

Additionally, many of our local school districts are partnering with community organizations to provide low-cost child care while students are doing distance learning:

  • Federal Way Public Schools is partnering with Right At School to offer families who qualify for Free & Reduced Meals a 25% discount for high-quality, flexible 2020-21 school year child care.
  • Highline Public Schools is partnering with community organizations to provide fee-based child care at several sites. Fees will be charged on a sliding scale.
  • Kent School District is partnering with the YMCA and Champions to offer child care at select schools on weekdays, open to all KSD families for a weekly cost.
  • Renton School District is partnering with Right At School to provide fee-based child care for elementary school students at three sites across the district: Hazelwood, Maplewood Heights, and Sartori.
  • Seattle Public Schools is partnering with the City of Seattle and community organizations to provide full-day child care in nearly 50 elementary and K8 schools while buildings are closed for COVID-19.
  • Auburn School District and Tukwila School District provide information for local families, as well.

Rental Assistance

For people having trouble paying rent or facing eviction due to the financial hardships brought on by the pandemic, there are several sources of assistance. King County provides a wealth of information here, but several particular programs are worth highlighting.

The United Way of King County has expanded its rental assistance program to meet the increased need during the pandemic. One month of rental assistance is being offered to people in King County struggling to pay rent due to the coronavirus.

Another source of rental assistance for residents of Auburn, Burien, Des Moines, Federal Way, Kent, Renton, SeaTac, or Tukwila is the Multi-Service Center’s Covid program. They accept a limited number of applications each week from households affected by the pandemic. Applications open on Sundays for the following week.

Finally, for people facing eviction, King County is participating in our state’s Eviction Rent Assistance program, which is funded by federal CARES Act dollars. If you are in need of assistance to forestall eviction, you can fill in a form online to be entered in the lottery pool. Drawings are held weekly, starting this week, to select tenants who may apply.

Mortgage Assistance

Homeowners who cannot pay their mortgage may have the right to temporary forbearance. The federal CARES Act provides protections for homeowners with federally or Government Sponsored Enterprise (GSE) backed mortgages (FHA, VA, USDA, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac). If you don’t have a federally or GSE-backed mortgage, you still may have relief options through your mortgage loan servicer.

You can get assistance by contacting your mortgage servicer, or by calling the state Department of Financial Institutions at their toll-free number 1-877-RING-DFI (746-4334) to learn how best to contact your mortgage servicer, and to learn more about your options.

In addition, if you would like to talk to a housing counselor, you can call the Washington Homeownership Hotline at 1.877.894.HOME.

Stay in Touch

If you’d like to follow what I’m working on, you can like my official legislative Facebook page here.

Please don’t hesitate to stay in touch. Stay safe and take care.

Always,

Senator Karen Keiser
Chair, Senate Labor & Commerce Committee
Senate President Pro Tempore

September 18th, 2020|E-News|

E-News: Unemployment benefits and returning to work

Dear Neighbors,

As our economy reopens, many people who have been furloughed or temporarily let go will be asked to return to work. For anyone who has been collecting unemployment benefits, that can present challenges. The Employment Security Department (ESD) has just published information to help people navigate the return to work. Please share this with anyone you know who might be able to make use of it.

Under normal circumstances, anyone collecting unemployment benefits is required to look for work. This requirement has been suspended at least through August 1 by the governor and legislative leaders due to the coronavirus pandemic. ESD is revising the job search requirements so that when they are eventually reinstated, they will take into account our new normal of social distancing.

If you are collecting unemployment benefits and are offered work, under most circumstances, you cannot refuse that offer and continue to collect benefits. However, there are some exceptions if you have a “good cause” reason. These are determined by ESD on a case-by-case basis.

For example, some employers are offering workers their old jobs back but with reduced wages or hours. That kind of situation would be reviewed, and the wages being offered would be compared for prevailing wage rates in the area to determine if benefits could be continued.

If the job you are offered does not lend itself to telework, some examples of good cause reasons not to accept the offer of work include:

Even if you are denied regular unemployment benefits because you refused an offer of work, you may be eligible for federally funded Pandemic Unemployment Assistance so long as the reason is that you are directly impacted by coronavirus. For example:

  • You must care for a child in your household who is unable to attend a school or daycare that has been closed as a direct result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • You have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and are awaiting a medical diagnosis.
  • A member of your household has been diagnosed with COVID-19.
  • You can’t get to work because of a quarantine imposed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public-health emergency.

You can find more information on the ESD website:

  • The Refusal of Work page provides information about when someone can or cannot refuse an offer of work and retain unemployment benefits.
  • The Return to Work page provides information and links to resources for both employers and workers.

I also want you to know that the Employment Security Department is making significant progress on resolving claims for people who have been waiting several weeks for the benefits and in recovering the majority of the funds stolen by a criminal network of fraudsters.

I hope you and your family are managing during these difficult pandemic days. I think about how my mom managed during World War II when my father was in the Army for more than four years in every theater of war in North Africa, Italy and France.

The motto then still stands now: “We Can Do This!” Please stay safe, keep your distance, wear your mask and wash your hands.

If you’d like to follow what I’m working on, you can like my official legislative Facebook page here.

Please don’t hesitate to stay in touch. Stay safe and take care.

Always,

Senator Karen Keiser

Chair, Senate Labor & Commerce Committee

Senate President Pro Tempore

July 9th, 2020|E-News|

State eyeing Thurston County for Sea-Tac-size airport

From KIRO 7

Commercial 737s could touch down in south Thurston County.

“An airport down here would be pretty cool,” resident D.J. Crawford said.

The state’s Commercial Aviation Coordinating Commission is looking for a place to build a Sea-Tac -sized airport.

“We are really near capacity at Sea-Tac International Airport and it’s the smallest international airport in the country with no room to grow, ” Sen. Karen Keiser said. “We have got to figure out some options here.”

Last month, the state sent county commissioners a letter asking if Thurston County would be interested in being a contender for a commercial airport. Commissioners chose not to respond until they receive feedback from the community.

The site is 4,500 acres north of Littlerock, south of Black Lake and west of I-5.

Thurston County Commissioner Tye Menser said an airport would change the county’s entire landscape.

“An airport, like Sea-Tac, that’s like a little city,” he said. “It is a massive change to the character of a community, so it’s something we really have to talk to our citizens about.”

Previous studies show the flight path would take planes over downtown Olympia and the state capitol.

Some people aren’t on board.

“A solution is for all of us, myself included, to stop flying around so much,” resident Naki Stevens said. “I think we need to make do with the airport we have at Sea-Tac. It’s only an hour away.”

Projections show by 2050, the state will need twice the capacity for air travel. Many feel a second airport is the only choice.

“I don’t know what the other options are,” Menser said. “It may be that Thurston County is the best of a set of bad choices and, if that’s true, maybe my mind could be changed.”

It will be a while before a decision is made. Six locations will be selected by the start of next year. The list will be narrowed down to two spots by September 2021. The final decision will be made by Jan. 1, 2022.

Those who would like to weigh in are asked to contact WSDOT’s Commercial Aviation Coordinating Commission or the Thurston County Board of Commissioners.

By Shelby Miller

July 1st, 2020|News|

E-News: Mask Up for Phase 2

Dear Neighbors,

We have much to be proud of. Working together, we have slowed the spread of coronavirus. As we reopen our state’s economy, it’s important to exercise caution so that we can safely resume many of the activities of our daily lives. Now that King County has entered Phase 2, it’s all the more important to follow public health guidelines about hand washing, social distancing, and especially wearing face masks. You can read more below.

King County moves to Phase 2

In Phase 2, social gatherings may be held with five or fewer people outside your household. Restaurants can reopen at less than 50% capacity, and retailers at less than 30% capacity. Businesses must follow state guidelines to ensure the health and safety of employees and customers. These include social distancing, regular hand washing and wearing cloth masks. You can read more about Phase 2 here, and you can find the guidelines for businesses and employees here.

Mask Up, Washington

Despite the progress we have made, we are seeing a worrisome uptick in coronavirus cases across Washington. Recent research suggests that one of the best ways to reduce transmission is by wearing cloth face masks. The masks protect other people from getting the virus from us when we talk, cough or sneeze.

Even if you don’t have symptoms, you could still be a danger to others. Between 20% and 40% of people with COVID-19 don’t show any symptoms but can still spread the virus. Wearing masks in public places helps protect everyone you meet and is a crucial way to allow for safe reopening of economic activity.

That’s why the governor has issued a statewide mandate for mask-wearing in public. There are exemptions for people with health conditions, and there are times when you can remove your mask, like when eating at a restaurant. You also do not need to wear a mask when you are alone or only with the members of your household, or when you are outdoors and six feet from other people.

Until a vaccine or cure is developed, masks will be our best defense.

This mask rule is like the speed limits on our roads—it’s about preventing reckless behavior that can hurt others. We can all do our part to protect others!

Stay in Touch

If you’d like to follow what I’m working on, you can like my official legislative Facebook page here.

Please don’t hesitate to stay in touch. Stay safe and take care.

Always,

Senator Karen Keiser

Chair, Senate Labor & Commerce Committee
Senate President Pro Tempore

June 25th, 2020|E-News|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Keiser applauds financial support measure for furloughed workers, employers

Keiser applauds financial support measure for furloughed workers, employers

From the Kent Reporter

State Sen. Karen Keiser, D-Des Moines, announced her support of Gov. Jay Inslee’s proclamation to strengthen and extend the state Employment Security Department’s SharedWork program for small businesses, nonprofits and local governments.

SharedWork is a voluntary business sustainability program with the state that provides flexibility to retain employees at reduced hours.

“The governor’s action to strengthen our state’s SharedWork program will remove barriers to partial employment for many workers who have been furloughed and will help keep small businesses, non-profits, and local governments solvent during this crisis,” Keiser said in a June 23 news release.

For claimants to be on SharedWork, their employers must apply to participate in the program, according to the Employment Security Department website. It allows employers to reduce hours by as much as 50 percent, while their employees collect partial benefits to replace a portion of their lost wages. The state uses the SharedWork chart to deduct their earnings from their weekly benefits.

“Washington’s SharedWork is a proven win-win program that provides businesses with the flexibility to retain employees through a voluntary sustainability program,” Keiser said. “It allows employers to reduce the hours of their staff by 10% to 50%, while their workers receive unemployment benefits that can largely offset their decreased pay.”

Thousands of Washington employers have used the SharedWork program to:

• Support business stability

• Retain skilled workers

• Reduce payroll costs

• Be a smart alternative to layoffs

• Explore training programs that develop workforce skills

“Through the CARES Act, the federal government will pick up 100% of the tab for state shared work programs during the pandemic, if state laws allow,” Keiser said. “The governor’s proclamation allows our state to take full advantage of this federal funding and also spares businesses the charges they would normally incur. The SharedWork program is a strong anti-recession tool because it keeps businesses, nonprofits, local government strong; keeps money flowing into workers’ pockets; and maintains the connections between employers and their workers, making it easier for the economy to rebound when the crisis is past.”

Employers and employees must follow certain rules as part of the program, including:

• Claimants on SharedWork do not have to look for other work.

• They must be available for all work offered by their regular employer.

• Employers must continue to pay for employees’ health insurance.

• SharedWork plans last one year and have a maximum benefits payable amount.

• Employees who work fewer hours may run out of benefits more quickly.

• SharedWork participants may be eligible for benefit extensions.

Organizations can find more information about the SharedWork program at https://esd.wa.gov/SharedWork.

By Steve Hunter

June 25th, 2020|News|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Keiser applauds measure to strengthen financial support for furloughed workers and employers

Keiser applauds measure to strengthen financial support for furloughed workers and employers

Upon the announcement of proclamation 20-58 by Governor Inslee, Sen. Karen Keiser (D-Des Moines) released the following statement:

The governor’s action today to strengthen our state’s SharedWork program will remove barriers to partial employment for many workers who have been furloughed and will help keep small businesses, non-profits, and local governments solvent during this crisis.

Washington’s SharedWork is a proven win-win program that provides businesses with the flexibility to retain employees through a voluntary sustainability program. It allows employers to reduce the hours of their staff by 10% to 50%, while their workers receive unemployment benefits that can largely offset their decreased pay.

Through the CARES Act, the federal government will pick up 100% of the tab for state shared work programs during the pandemic, if state laws allow. The governor’s proclamation allows our state to take full advantage of this federal funding and also spares businesses the charges they would normally incur.

The SharedWork program is a strong anti-recession tool because it keeps businesses, non-profits, local government strong; keeps money flowing into workers’ pockets; and maintains the connections between employers and their workers, making it easier for the economy to rebound when the crisis is past.

Organizations can find more information about the SharedWork program at https://esd.wa.gov/SharedWork.

June 22nd, 2020|News Release|
  • Permalink Gallery

    E-News: Food Assistance for School Children, School Reopening Guidelines

E-News: Food Assistance for School Children, School Reopening Guidelines

Dear Neighbors,

Our schools perform many crucial functions in the community, from their core mission of education to providing nutritious meals for students who otherwise wouldn’t have access to them. In this time of crisis, our schools are stepping up to make sure that school closures don’t mean that kids have to go hungry.

Pandemic Food Benefits

Because of the impact of the COVID pandemic, this summer, our state will help families with school children buy groceries. The benefit, Pandemic EBT (P-EBT) is available to families with children who are eligible for schools’ free or reduced-price meal programs. P-EBT benefits do not replace any child nutrition programs already offered, and families are encouraged to continue participating in grab-n-go meals or emergency food programs at their local schools and community locations.

Most families who already receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits, also known as SNAP or Basic Food, and whose children already receive free or reduced-price meals do not need to apply. The P-EBT benefits – a one-time amount up to $399 per eligible child in each household – will be automatically deposited onto existing EBT cards in early July.

Other families, including those whose children attend a school where meals are free for all students, will need to apply for free or reduced-price meals with their school district before June 30. Once approved by their school district, these families can apply for P-EBT online at Washingtonconnection.org before August 31 or the start of the 2020-2021 school year—whichever is later. Families who need to apply or who have other questions about P-EBT benefits can call the DSHS Customer Service Contact Center at 877-501-2233 on weekdays between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Guidelines for Reopening Schools

The Superintendent of Public Schools has released a set of guidelines for safely reopening schools in the fall, including measures such as instituting health screenings, requiring cloth face masks for staff and students, increasing hygiene and social distancing precautions in school buildings, and cancelling classes and activities that aren’t conducive to distancing. You can read more about the guidelines here.

Beware of Email Fraud Scam

Recently, Washington State employees were the target of a phishing campaign. Similar tricks may be used to target others.

The fraudsters are sending fake Secure Access Washington (SAW) emails in an attempt to trick individuals into providing their account credentials.

In the example above, users are being told they have 24 hours to correct inaccurate information or their SAW account will be restricted. SAW administrators will never send users an email asking for validation of account details. Do not click on the links in the email or reply to it.

Stay in Touch

If you’d like to follow what I’m working on, you can like my official legislative Facebook page here.

Please don’t hesitate to stay in touch. Stay safe and take care.

Always,

Senator Karen Keiser

Chair, Senate Labor & Commerce Committee
Senate President Pro Tempore

June 11th, 2020|E-News|