Sen. Hasegawa Newsroom

VIDEO: Hasegawa stand up for real Voting Rights Act

OLYMPIA – Sen. Hasegawa spoke to the need to pass the real Washington Voting Rights Act, which would give underrepresented groups an equal voice in the democratic process.

March 15th, 2017|Uncategorized|
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    VIDEO: Sen. Hasegawa draws attention to the need to support martial arts’ studios

VIDEO: Sen. Hasegawa draws attention to the need to support martial arts’ studios

OLYMPIA- Sen. Bob Hasegawa gave a speech on a bill regarding yoga studios, and the need to regulate all Asian art-forms and health activities the same.

March 13th, 2017|Uncategorized|

VIDEO: Mid-session update

OLYMPIA – Sen. Hasegawa discusses the levy cliff delay bill, health justice for people of the Marshall Islands and why he voted for SB 5001.

March 10th, 2017|Uncategorized|
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    Hasegawa on levy cliff: The people’s voices cannot be ignored

Hasegawa on levy cliff: The people’s voices cannot be ignored

OLYMPIA – A month and a half after the House of Representatives passed a similar measure, the state Senate passed Senate Bill 5023 just before a key deadline, delaying the so-called levy cliff and a $358 million dollar cut to Washington schools. Following passage of the bill, Sen. Bob Hasegawa, D-Seattle, released this statement:

“Every office in the state Senate has been getting hundreds of calls and emails, urging legislators to fight for this bill. The people of this state and Democrats in the Senate never gave up. Although this should never have been a partisan issue, the voices of the people cannot be ignored. I want to especially thank the people of the 11th district that contacted me and other legislators in the past weeks. It was because of these efforts the Senate Republican majority finally allowed the bill to come up for a vote.

“Nearly every school in our state would have seen cuts if this had not passed. Seattle Schools stood to lose tens of millions of dollars, with kids in areas like the 11th district getting hit the hardest.

“I am glad this is now resolved so schools don’t have to waste more time on planning for cuts, and the Legislature can stop wasting time and negotiate a proposal that fully and fairly funds our public schools.”

 

March 8th, 2017|Uncategorized|
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    Hasegawa bill will help mitigate impacts of public facilities to South Seattle

Hasegawa bill will help mitigate impacts of public facilities to South Seattle

OLYMPIA – A bill by Sen. Bob Hasegawa, D-Seattle, addresses impacts to neighborhoods in large cities with high poverty levels and high rates of ethnic diversity by the construction of public facilities, like light rail stations.

“When light rail stations went up in South Seattle, the people who lived in those neighborhoods paid the steepest price,” Hasegawa said. “The city instituted a parking fee, so families suddenly had to pay to park in their own neighborhoods, even when wealthier neighborhoods in Seattle are relieved of this fee burden. This bill ensures that when the city constructs, or approves construction of a public facility that negatively impacts neighborhoods with families already struggling to make ends meet, they don’t further burden the people living there.”

Senate Bill 5725 requires cities with populations of over 550,000 that permit, construct, or operate a public facility in a neighborhood with a high poverty level and high rate of ethnic diversity to assume responsibility for the negative impacts of that facility and develop a mitigation plan. The limited scope of the bill would only apply to certain neighborhoods in the City of Seattle, with the greatest number in South Seattle.

“I see this as a social justice issue,” Hasegawa added. “Washington cities need to double-down on efforts to mitigate burdens on diverse communities and working families so they aren’t pushed out of their homes. This bill will set a framework to help achieve that goal.” 

 

March 2nd, 2017|Uncategorized|
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    Hasegawa bill to allow wheelchair accessible taxicabs to use HOV lanes passes Senate

Hasegawa bill to allow wheelchair accessible taxicabs to use HOV lanes passes Senate

OLYMPIA – A bill by Sen. Bob Hasegawa, D-Seattle, that grants wheelchair accessible taxicabs authority to use high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes passed the state Senate unanimously today.

“This bill would assist those in the disabled community in our state,” Hasegawa said. “Wheelchair accessible taxis cost much more to outfit, which is why there are so few of these vehicles. It is hard to make these taxis economically viable for the owners, and accessible for disabled riders if they are stuck in increasingly bad traffic. The passage of this bill gives a needed boost to both the riders and drivers.”

Under current law, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) and local authorities may reserve portions of any highways under their jurisdiction as limited access or HOV lanes. Senate Bill 5018 gives WSDOT and local authorities the ability to grant access to HOV lanes by wheelchair accessible taxicabs. According to testimony given at the bill’s public hearing, there are currently only 53 wheelchair accessible taxis in King County, so the bill should not negatively impact the existing HOV lane users.

March 1st, 2017|Uncategorized|
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    Hasegawa bill ensures emergency notices will be available in languages other than English

Hasegawa bill ensures emergency notices will be available in languages other than English

OLYMPIA – A bill by Sen. Bob Hasegawa, D-Seattle, passed the Senate unanimously on Monday and requires state agencies to provide public notices and state of emergency notices in languages other than English.

“This is a civil rights issue, a social justice issue and a public safety issue,” Hasegawa said. “The population of people who speak a language other than English at home is rapidly growing. Public safety is a core function of government, and yet when there were fires in Eastern Washington, farm workers who were in the path of the fires did not know they were in danger and had no instructions for protecting themselves. I also heard about a Vietnamese family who used barbeques inside when the power went out and they died. This bill is necessary to protect people throughout Washington. ”  

Senate Bill 5046 was requested by the Washington State Commission on Hispanic Affairs, and requires state agencies to provide public notices and state of emergency notices in a manner most effective at communicating with significant segments of the community who speak a language other than English. A significant segment is defined as five percent or more of residents, or one thousand residents, whichever is fewer, who are of limited English proficiency in the affected city, town, or county. This is the same standard maintained under the Civil Rights Act.

 

March 1st, 2017|Uncategorized|

Hasegawa speaks on Latino Legislative Day

Whether or not you can vote, in a democracy you can take a stand and multiply your voice.

February 27th, 2017|Uncategorized|

VIDEO: Hasegawa marks Day of Remembrance in state Senate

OLYMPIA – On Wednesday in the Legislature, lawmakers marked the 75th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066, which sent more than 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent to internment camps. Sen. Hasegawa, D-Seattle, spoke on the Senate floor about the meaning of the Day of Remembrance, as it is known, to not only the Japanese American community, but to the entire American public. “It is everyone of us who suffers when anyone suffers,” Hasegawa said.

February 17th, 2017|Uncategorized|
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    State Senate Members of Color Caucus mark 75th anniversary of Japanese internment

State Senate Members of Color Caucus mark 75th anniversary of Japanese internment


OLYMPIA – On Feb. 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, mandating the internment of all Americans of Japanese descent – more than 120,000. State lawmakers offered resolutions to mark the 75th Anniversary of the signing of that executive order, what is now called the Day of Remembrance, and hosted groups and individuals at the state Capitol on Wednesday. Regarding the day’s events, the Senate Members of Color Caucus released this statement:

“My parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles were all incarcerated without due process as a result of Executive Order 9066,” said Sen. Bob Hasegawa, D-Seattle, sponsor of Senate Resolution 8617. “Honoring the Day of Remembrance is as important today as it has ever been. Each year we lose more Nisei World War II Veterans and others of the generation who lived through this pivotal time in our nation’s history. It is up to us to keep the memory alive of their struggles, patriotism and the injustices committed against them in the name of security. We need to remember the root causes of what led to the Japanese American internment – ‘racial prejudice, war hysteria and a failure of political leadership,’ according to the Congressional Commission that years later investigated the internments. A long memory and vigilance will help keep us from repeating history.”

“Without trial and without reason, thousands of Japanese Americans were imprisoned during one of our nation’s darkest hours,” said Sen. Steve Hobbs, D-Lake Stevens. “Despite this injustice, in an act that is the epitome of duty and love of country, more than a thousand interned Japanese Americans still volunteered to fight for the country that had turned its back on them. That is patriotism in its truest form.”

“The Day of Remembrance is a chance to reflect on the challenges we have faced and the obstacles we still have to overcome,” said Sen. John McCoy, D-Tulalip. “We should take a long, hard look at this moment in time – a time when people who contribute to our state find themselves in fear of deportation and losing their constitutional rights. We must continue to stand with our friends and neighbors in the face of injustice.”

“The Day of Remembrance is a time to remember the grave injustices our government perpetuated against our fellow Americans of Japanese descent 75 years ago. It is also a time to reflect on our country’s long struggle with racism,” said Sen. Rebecca Saldaña, D-Seattle. “Fear, coupled with racism, led to Executive Order 9066. One of the best ways to honor the Washingtonians and Americans who were wrongfully incarcerated during WWII is to ensure this injustice never happens again.”

To watch a short video on the Day of Remembrance, please click here.

February 15th, 2017|Uncategorized|