News Release

Governor signs two bills sponsored by Sen. Hasegawa

March 31st, 2020|

Governor Jay Inslee signed two closely watched bills recently that were championed through the 2020 Legislative Session by Sen. Bob Hasegawa (D-Seattle).

Senate Bill 6066 received Inslee’s approval on March 18, and will expand ethnic studies opportunities in schools throughout Washington. The governor signed Senate Bill 6086 on March 31, removing barriers to opioid use disorder treatments.

More on SB 6066

SB 6066 requires the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) to provide ethnic studies materials for all grades, including grades K-6. Just last year, the Legislature passed a Hasegawa bill requiring ethnic studies materials for grades 7-12.

“As our kids move through the K-12 system, they all need to learn about the diverse and beautiful cultures that make up our communities,” Hasegawa said. “All kids need to understand how we all fit in to making American what it is.  Ethnic studies helps kids build self-esteem, self-awareness and understand how important we all are in America.  This bill is a step toward equity in our education system.”

More on SB 6086

SB 6086 removes barriers to opioid use disorder treatments by improving access to automatic medication dispensing devices used in treating opioid use disorders. The bill increases the supply limits up to 12 days from automated dispensing devices for medication that are under the supervision of licensed pharmacists.

“Our communities have been struggling to address our opioid epidemic, and we must provide people with all the tools possible to help them recover,” Hasegawa said. “This bill expands access to one of those tools and will undoubtedly help us to save lives.”

Three Hasegawa education equity bills pass state Senate

February 13th, 2020|

Three bills designed to increase equity in Washington’s education system passed the Washington State Senate on Wednesday.

The bills, all sponsored by Sen. Bob Hasegawa (D-Seattle), would increase equity by addressing ethnic studies curricula, the shortage of teachers from underrepresented communities, and Individualized Education Programs (IEPs).

“My biggest priority for our education system is equity,” Hasegawa said. “Our kids need to know about their heritage and history, have teachers and role models who look like them, and have access to education that fits their needs. While we still need to work hard to achieve true equity, these bills move us in the right direction.”

Hasegawa’s bills do the following:

  • Senate Bill 6066 requires the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) to provide ethnic studies materials for all grades, including grades K-6. Just last year, the Legislature passed a Hasegawa bill requiring ethnic studies materials for grades 7-12. This new bill expands on that previous work, and encourages schools to teach ethnic studies. To learn more about why ethnic studies programs are important, watch Hasegawa’s committee testimony.
  • Senate Bill 6138 modifies the purpose of the existing Beginning Educator Support Team Program to include support for mentor educators and beginning teachers of underrepresented populations. OSPI would give grant priority to schools and districts that work with program participants from underrepresented populations or have strong ties to these populations.
  • Senate Bill 6047 prohibits schools and districts from retaliating against employees who report noncompliance with IEPs. This helps ensure that educators and staff will advocate for their students without fear of retaliation, and that students will receive the support they need and are entitled to under their IEPs. Video of Hasegawa’s committee testimony is available online.

All three bills now move to the state House of Representatives for consideration.