E-News

E-Newsletter: Coronavirus Updates and the Census

April 3rd, 2020|

Dear Friends and Neighbors in the 11th District,

I hope that you are all continuing to do everything you can to keep yourselves and your families safe. Since the coronavirus situation is constantly evolving, and the available resources are constantly expanding, I wanted to provide you with another update.

I also wanted to remind you that it’s time to participate in the 2020 U.S. Census. This newsletter provides some helpful information about how to participate, and why your participation is so necessary for our community.

COVID-19 RELIEF PROGRAMS

At the federal level

  • Stimulus Checks: Most adults will get $1,200, although some would get less. For every qualifying child age 16 or under, the payment will be an additional $500. This is a one time payment, but congress may pass future bills allowing additional payments. The IRS says checks will be sent out in the next three weeks to those who file a tax return.
  • Paid Sick and Family and Medical Leave: The U.S. Department of Labor issued a temporary rule related to implementing new paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Please find more information below this email.
  • Small businesses: Your business may be eligible for the Paycheck Protection Program for a loan up to $10 million, an Economic Injury Disaster Loan/Grant advance of up to $10,000, and/or SBA Debt Relief.
  • Student Loans: Through September 30, 2020, federal student loan payments are automatically suspended with no late fees or penalties. This only applies to federal student loans, not private student loans.
  • Car Loans: Many lenders are offering special forbearance programs to help borrowers through the next several months. Many provisions allow for deferred or delayed payments caused by Covid-19.
  • Taxes: Both the federal Internal Revenue Service and the Washington Department of Revenue are providing extensions on taxes and waivers of penalties.

Recently, Congress passed a bipartisan economic relief plan to help people nationwide deal with the financial impacts of the coronavirus outbreak. This helpful FAQ New York Times article provides a great explanation.

At the state level

  • Evictions: Gov. Jay Inslee announced a moratorium on evictions on March 18, that prohibits landlords from serving an eviction notice for default on payment of rent (unless there’s an affidavit) and prohibits local law enforcement from acting on eviction orders.
  • Mortgages: Gov. Jay Inslee and Charlie Clark, director of the Washington State Department of Financial Institutions (DFI) announced the state is taking steps to assist distressed Washington homeowners who are unable to make their mortgage payments due to COVID-19 (coronavirus) restrictions.
  • Unemployment Benefits: If you were laid off or had your hours decreased as a result of COVID-19, you are likely eligible for unemployment benefits. Please see the WA Employment Security Department site for details on your eligibility and/or go here to apply.

The best place to find accurate and up-to-date information about COVID-19 in Washington state is www.coronavirus.wa.gov. The King County Public Health website is also a great resource and can be found at www.kingcounty.gov/covid.

At the city level

  • City of Seattle: Here’s a comprehensive list of services and benefits offered during the COVID-19 pandemic: City of Seattle COVID-19: Resources for Community webpage. It includes resources related to health insurance, to food, to information for workers, businesses, and nonprofits, to resources for artists. Translation features will be available in the next few days.
  • City of Tukwila: operational changes
  • City of Renton: Mayor Pavone’s publishes daily COVID-19 updates, which appears to have a comprehensive list of services, resources, and operational changes in the city.

CENSUS

my2020census.gov

Data from the census guides more than $675 billion in federal funding to communities each year. For every 1,000 people who don’t complete the census, our district could lose $2 million in funding. It has never been easier to participate in the 2020 census: by mail (through a paper questionnaire mailed to your household), by phone (844-330-2020) or online (at my2020census.gov).

When you complete the census, you’ll be asked to provide the number of people living in your household as well as the demographic information (age, race and sex) for each person.  There is no citizenship question on the 2020 census, and responses are confidential and only used for statistical purposes.

  • The Count of College/University Students: Although campuses have shut down or gone online, college students should count their household (roommates and all) even if the college student happens to have relocated recently in response to COVID-19. The Bureau has produced a quick video to explain the process and here is a useful written explainer from the Population Reference Bureau.
  • African American Census Guideinformation on how to complete the census and some rich news stories on why an accurate count matters to the African American community in our state.
  • Census Bureau’s Print Guide in Marshallese (online here): Marshallese is a language important in our state, but it was not large enough across the United States to make the Bureau’s list for foreign language help. If you have a Marshallese community in your area, here’s a great resource for you.

census

My thoughts are with you all as we continue to fight the coronavirus outbreak in our communities. Please keep yourselves and your families safe.

Sincerely,

Bob

Hasegawa signature


From the U.S. Department of Labor:

Paid Sick and Family and Medical Leave for COVID-19

The U.S. Department of Labor issued a temporary rule related to implementing new paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act.

Helping Unemployed Americans

The Department announced new guidance on unemployment insurance for states in response to COVID-19. The new guidance helps states implement new legislation that makes workers who are normally not eligible for unemployment benefits—such as self-employed and gig workers—eligible for benefits and that provides expanded unemployment insurance benefits for all workers.

Respiratory Protection Guidance

OSHA has issued interim enforcement guidance to help combat supply shortages of disposable N95 filtering facepiece respirators (N95 FFRs).

Updates and Resources

E-Newsletter: More Coronavirus Resources

March 27th, 2020|

Dear 11th District Resident,

As you may have heard, on Monday, Governor Inslee issued a “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” order, which will be effective for a minimum of two weeks. The order requires every Washingtonian to stay at home, except for people:

  • Pursuing an essential activity, like shopping for groceries or going to a medical appointment.
  • Getting takeout food. (Food deliveries also are permitted)
  • Going to work at an essential business.
  • Going outside for walks and exercise, as long as social distancing of 6 feet is maintained.
  • What does it mean to stay home? 

Coronavirus.wa.gov is a centralized portal that has information in many different languages on school closureschild careunemployment insurancesmall business assistancegeneral financial assistancehealth insurance, and much more. Here are some other resources that might be helpful:

As I’m sure many of you will be left with questions, below you will find further information, distributed by CAPAA, on related issues such as domestic violence in isolation, child care, unemployment, and discrimination. If you have further questions, DOH operates a hotline with multiple language assistance, from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily at 1-800-525-0127.

In Solidarity,

Hasegawa signature

Table of Contents

  • Translated Coronavirus Factsheets:
  • Domestic Violence in Isolation
  • School Closures and Frequently Asked Questions
  • Employer, Worker, and Economic Support Resources
  • Insurance Co-Pays
  • Support Chinatown/International District Businesses
  • Protect APA Workers in Response to COVID-19: APA Labor Alliance Resources
  • Anti-stigma Resources
  • Report Discrimination
  • Stop the Spread of Disease
  • Additional Information
  • Questions? Try the new nCoV Call Center.

Translated Coronavirus Factsheets:

For the languages we don’t have currently, please contact the King County or Washington State Novel Coronavirus Call Centers. Operators will be able to connect with a third-party interpreter. (Contact information below.)

Domestic Violence in Isolation

We know abuse and violence thrives in isolation.

API Chaya is open dedicated to serving. We know many people are staying home more, and have less access to community and other resources via work and other daily routines (commute, gym, social activities, etc). We know our mental, spiritual and physical health is impacted and interconnected. We know that disabled communities have been building up care networks and resources for a long time, and our work continues that legacy.

API CHAYA IS OPEN We have moved to remote operations. We are available on our helpline (1-877-922-4292) and office line (206-467-9976) from Monday to Friday, 10am to 4pm.

After hours resources: National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-7233 King County Sexual Assault Resource Center: 1-888-998-6423 National Human Trafficking Hotline: 1-888-373-7888

May we as a community continue to put collective care into practice, we hope this resource can support this practice.

API

School Closures and Frequently Asked Questions

The state Department of Health wants to keep you as informed as possible about continuing developments surrounding COVID-19 as well as guidance and resources you can share with others in your networks.  If you want to manage your e-newsletter subscription preferences, you can do so here.

Schools closed statewide. Gov. Jay Inslee and Superintendent Chris Reykdal announced that schools will be closed in statewide at least through April 24. This closure is intended to interrupt the spread of COVID-19 in these counties. This is bound to be a stressful time for families needing to find a safe place for their children quickly. Some things to remember as you navigate these unprecedented challenges:

  • Remember to practice techniques that work for you to manage your own stress. Sleep, exercise, good nutrition, meditation. We need to make sure we stay healthy and resilient in the face of such a stressful time.
  • Because our elders are at high risk of severe disease from COVID-19, please be respectful of people over age 60 trying to isolate themselves at home. Even if they are your parents. And even if they are begging to provide childcare. For the health and safety of the loving grandparents, consider whether it’s possible for your family to find an alternate source of backup childcare.
  • Remember that teenagers, who are also out of school right now, make great babysitters!
  • Consider whether you can support working families in your neighborhood by sharing care of small groups of kids.
  • Take the kids outside as the weather gets warmer and enjoy our parks instead of crowded indoor spaces.
  • Pay attention to your particular school district and the services they are offering. Some schools are finding ways to continue to provide lunch or on-line learning

 For More Information:

Employer, Worker, and Economic Support Resources

Washington counties now eligible for disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration

Small businesses in many Washington counties are now eligible to apply for low‑interest U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) Economic Injury Disaster Loans to offset economic losses because of reduced revenues caused by the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. More counties are likely to become eligible in Washington state. Check the SBA website for the most updated information. This is one of the first SBA disaster declarations in the country related to COVID-19.

The SBA launched www.sba.gov/coronavirus to provide information about resources small businesses can access now to navigate their business through the COVID-19 pandemic. This includes financing through SBA Loan Guarantee Program – working capital, microloans, express loans and lines of credit – and counseling services through the SBA Resource Partner Network to help businesses navigate preparedness plans.

City of Seattle Small Business Stabilization Grant Opportunities

Applications for Small Business Stabilization Fund impacted by #COVID19 are now in Chinese (Simplified and Traditional), Korean, Spanish, and Somali. Grants will be awarded in an amount up to $10,000. Visit the website for more info.

Grant money may only be used for the operating expenses of the awarded business. The operating expenses are defined as the day-to-day trading operations of the business such as covering payroll and rent. Businesses must meet the following requirements to be eligible to apply:

  • The business owner must have low- or median income (≤80% of the Area Median Income);
  • the business must have 5 or fewer employees, including the owner(s);
  • the business must have a physical location (i.e. brick and mortar; food trucks, vendors, etc.) and
  • the business must have experienced a loss of income due to COVID-19.

Benefits available to workers impacted by COVID-19:

The Employment Security Department has just adopted a series of emergency rules to help people who are affected by COVID-19 and have a temporary layoff, isolation and quarantine for workers and businesses. Check out their website to see what benefits might be helpful to you.

If you’d like to access these resources in another language, please call 1-800-318-6022 and request free interpretation services in order to receive additional information about employment security information & COVID-19.

Learn about the new recovery package to ease financial impacts of COVID-19:          

After outreach to small business owners and community stakeholders, Mayor Durkan announced new initial actions to provide immediate relief for small businesses impacted by COVID-19, including a deferral of B&O taxes, an expansion of the Small Business Stabilization Fund, assistance with accessing SBA Loans, relief for utility payments, and a new Small Business Recovery Task Force. Learn more.

Online Fundraising for Non-Profits

This difficult time presents the opportunity to get creative about online giving. Courtsey of Chris Davenport from Digital Fundraising Conference, the following link provides some timely tips to consider regarding the online giving experience. Of course, evaluate your own process and see what’s right for you and your donors and organizations:

https://digitalfundraisingconference.com/4-part-series-make-donors-feel-special

Join weekly small business webinars:    

The City of Seattle’s Office of Economic Development is supporting small businesses by holding weekly calls to share new developments, hear about the impacts you are experiencing, and answer your questions. Register to join Wednesdays from 11:00am to 12:00pm.

Other available resources:

The Governor’s Office has compiled a list of resources to support employers and workers who have work or economic problems related to COVID-19. This includes information on:

  • Possible paid leave options
  • Employers experiencing work stoppages
  • Export Assistance
  • And more

Insurance Co-Pays

Great News! The Insurance Commissioner announced that it will require insurers to waive copays and deductibles for testing for COVID-19. If you don’t have health insurance, contact the Washington Health Benefit Exchange (www.wahealthplanfinder.org) to find out if you qualify for free health coverage (www.hca.wa.gov) or a special enrollment for individual health insurance.

Protect APA Workers in Response to COVID-19: APA Labor Alliance Resources

In Washington State, all public employees will continue to be paid during this time. However, without federal policies guaranteeing paid sick leave and adequate health insurance coverage for all workers, many working people are effectively prevented from following the CDC’s guidance to stay home when they are sick.

Check APALA’s tool kit in its entirety here. Also check out AFL-CIO’s COVID-19 outbreak resources.

Wash Your Hands


apala

Anti-stigma Resources

“We’re stronger as a community when we stand together against discrimination. Take advantage of these resources to prevent, interrupt, and respond to stigma.”

– Anti-Stigma Resources, Seattle & King County Public Health Department

During this time, you can help reduce stigma and bias against people, as well:

  • Speak up if you hear, see, or read stigmatizing or harassing comments or misinformation.
  • Show compassion and support for individuals and communities most closely impacted and anyone who might be sick.

Resources to combat stigma and discrimination can be accessed at Public Health’s webpage. Click here to access anti-stigma resources.

*CAPAA has requested this information be translated into traditional & simplified Chinese. CAPAA also requested that all Coronavirus health updates be coupled with anti-stigma and anti-racism messaging.

Read this blog post co-authored by CAPAA Executive Director Toshiko Hasegawa and WA St. Secretary of Health John Wiesman: It takes all of us to reduce stigma.

mask1


Mask2

Report Discrimination

State, county, and city governments and other organizations often have a place to report discrimination including, but not limited to, the resources listed below:

Washington State Human Rights Commission

Under the law, everyone has the right to be free from discrimination at work, in housing, in a public accommodation, or when seeking credit and insurance. Any individual who believes that he or she has been discriminated against based on protected class status may file a charge of discrimination for employers, housing providers, and businesses.

King County Office of Civil Rights

Our office has authority to handle discrimination complaints only for King County government and for employers, housing providers, and businesses in the unincorporated parts of King County (outside the cities).

Seattle Office for Civil Rights

This office upholds laws that protect you against discriminatory harassment in housing, employment, or public places within Seattle city limits.

City of Spokane’s Human Rights Commission

This is the appropriate point of contact if you reside in the City of Spokane.

Spokane County Human Rights Task Force

This is the appropriate point of contact if you reside elsewhere in the Spokane County.

*CAPAA has requested this information be turned into a flyer and translated into traditional & simplified Chinese.

viruses

Stop the Spread of Disease

Take the same steps to protect yourself from novel coronavirus as you would to reduce your risk of catching any respiratory virus:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Avoid touching your face – including eyes, nose, or mouth – with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes, in your elbow or into a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash and wash your hands.
  • Clean and disinfect “high touch” objects and surfaces such as doorknobs, faucet handles, railings, and shared keyboards.
  • STAY HOME if you are sick or symptomatic, and seek healthcare if needed.

Wash hands

Additional Information

More information on 2019-nCoV, including prevention, hygiene, travel, and more, can be found online at the following reputable sources:

Questions? Try the new nCoV Call Center.

News! Washington State expanded its call center so we can answer more of your questions quicker! The call center is available 6:00 am – 10:00 pm 7 days a week. The Washington call center can answer questions about the Novel Coronavirus, how it spreads and what to do if you have symptoms.

Call 1-800-525-0127 and press #.

King County also now offers a coronavirus call center. The helpline is open from 8:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. everyday. Dial 206-477-3977.

*Interpreter services available upon dialing.

E-Newsletter: Coronavirus Resources

March 20th, 2020|

Dear 11th District Resident,

I’m so impressed with how our community has come together to keep our families and community healthy during this novel coronavirus/COVID-19 outbreak. I understand there are many hardships each one of us is facing and the state is doing its best to mitigate those hardships while also managing the spread of the virus. As one of our last actions before the legislature adjourned last week, we appropriated $200 million toward fighting the virus and some of the impacts on our families (HB 2965). We may re-convene in a special session if more resources are necessary.

I’m sure that many of you are concerned and stressed as we all try to get through this unprecedented event. Having information is helpful to relieve that stress so I want to share with you the website created by our state government to help keep all our communities informed.  You can find it here: coronavirus.wa.gov.

This website contains a wealth of information from Governor Jay Inslee’s office, our state agencies, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, local governments, and more. For your convenience, I’ve included some of the helpful information below – from tools for handling stress, to resources for our out-of-work neighbors, to supports for businesses, to tips for talking to kids. But I encourage you to explore this website for yourselves, and to pass it on to others in our community who have questions.

In addition, I have heard from many people who are being laid off from their hospitality and restaurant jobs as well as the owners of these establishments who are seeking assistance to cover payroll or otherwise maintain their business. There is information for you further down this email from the Small Business Administration and our state Dep. of Commerce. More resources will become available shortly, and the list grows by the minute. Check coronavirus.wa.gov often for the most up to date info.

The main thing to remember is to just use common sense and take common sense precautions as you always should. Remember the things your mother taught you like cover your mouth when you cough or nose when you sneeze (preferably into a tissue, but at least into the crook of your elbow/arm if tissue is not available); wash your hands often and thoroughly; give people their personal space—although that space is increased to 6 feet at this time; look out for neighbors if they’re struggling; cut people some slack—we’re all dealing with this in different ways and facing different challenges; don’t be greedy and hoard (you don’t need to stockpile 3 months of toilet paper); you know all those things we all learned in kindergarten. Together, we’ll get through this crisis as a stronger and more empathetic community.

Washington State official coronavirus website: coronavirus.wa.gov

Bob

Hasegawa signature


Translated fact sheets can be accessed online at King County’s COVID-19 page. Note that COVID-19 fact sheets are now available in Tagalog, Marshallese, Khmer, Thai, courtesy of King County.

What to do if you are ill

If you are ill with fever and a cough or non-acute shortness of breath, stay home. If you are unsure of how to care for yourself or are concerned about your condition, call your health care provider for advice. If you feel you need to visit your doctor, call them first. Keep yourself separated from other people and animals in your home. Cover your coughs and sneezes and wash your hands often.

Leave some for your neighbor – don’t buy more than you need!

Washington State’s supply chains are operating normally, yet consumers are overstocking and clearing store shelves of the items that sick neighbors, doctors, dentists and emergency response personnel need to stay safe. Health experts emphasize the best way to protect yourself from infection is through washing your hands frequently and limiting contact with others, not by overstocking certain supplies. Leave some for the folks who need them most!

Supporting affected employers and workers

State agencies have been working with federal agencies, employers and workers to support businesses and workers affected by COVID-19.

Resources for you and your family

Stopping the spread of coronavirus is an effort we all play a part in. Learn how to protect and care for yourself and your family, cope with feelings of isolation or anxiety, determine whether you or a loved one is at higher risk from COVID-19, and find resources to get the care you need.

The list of public supports and resources is growing by the minute. Check coronavirus.wa.gov for the most up to date information.  As always, don’t hesitate to reach out to me via email or phone. Please keep yourselves, your families and your neighbors healthy and happy.

  • Permalink Gallery

    E-Newsletter: Coronavirus Anti-Stigma Resources & Translated Materials

E-Newsletter: Coronavirus Anti-Stigma Resources & Translated Materials

March 5th, 2020|

Dear 11th District Resident,

The following coronavirus update and best prevention practices is provided courtesy of the Washington State Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs (CAPAA).  It contains links to resources translated into several selected languages.

You should visit the state Department of Health website dedicated specifically to coronavirus information here: https://www.doh.wa.gov/emergencies/coronavirus

Or, call their hotline at 1-800-525-0127 and press #.

In solidarity,

Hasegawa signature


Translated Coronavirus Factsheets:

*CAPAA has requested these factsheets be translated into Tagalog & Marshallese. 


Anti-stigma Resources

During this time, you can help reduce stigma and bias against people, as well:

  • Speak up if you hear, see, or read stigmatizing or harassing comments or misinformation.
  • Show compassion and support for individuals and communities most closely impacted and anyone who might be sick.

Resources to combat stigma and discrimination can be accessed at Public Health’s webpage. Click here to access anti-stigma resources.

*CAPAA has requested this information be translated into traditional & simplified Chinese. CAPAA also requested that all Coronavirus health updates be coupled with anti-stigma and anti-racism messaging.

Read this blog post co-authored by CAPAA Executive Director Toshiko Hasegawa and WA St. Secretary of Health John Wiesman: It takes all of us to reduce stigma.


Report Discrimination

State, county, and city governments and other organizations often have a place to report discrimination including, but not limited to, the resources listed below:

Washington State Human Rights Commission

Under the law, everyone has the right to be free from discrimination at work, in housing, in a public accommodation, or when seeking credit and insurance. Any individual who believes that he or she has been discriminated against based on protected class status may file a charge of discrimination for employers, housing providers, and businesses.

King County Office of Civil Rights

Our office has authority to handle discrimination complaints only for King County government and for employers, housing providers, and businesses in the unincorporated parts of King County (outside the cities).

Seattle Office for Civil Rights

This office upholds laws that protect you against discriminatory harassment in housing, employment, or public places within Seattle city limits.

City of Spokane’s Human Rights Commission

This is the appropriate point of contact if you reside in the City of Spokane.

Spokane County Human Rights Task Force

This is the appropriate point of contact if you reside elsewhere in the Spokane County.

*CAPAA has requested this information be turned into a flyer and translated into traditional & simplified Chinese. 


Stop the Spread of Disease

Take the same steps to protect yourself from novel coronavirus as you would to reduce your risk of catching any respiratory virus:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Avoid touching your face – including eyes, nose, or mouth – with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes, in your elbow or into a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash and wash your hands.
  • Clean and disinfect “high touch” objects and surfaces such as doorknobs, faucet handles, railings, and shared keyboards.
  • STAY HOME if you are sick or symptomatic, and seek healthcare if needed.

Questions? Try the new nCoV Call Center.

A new Washington call center can answer questions about the Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV), how it spreads and what to do if you have symptoms. Call 1-800-525-0127 and press #. More information on 2019-nCoV, including prevention, hygiene, travel, and more, can be found online at the following reputable sources:


1


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E-Newsletter: An update on the State Bank

February 7th, 2020|

State Bank video

Watch Bob Hasegawa’s most recent State Bank update by clicking the image above.

Dear Friends and Neighbors of the 11th Legislative District,

Creating a public bank of, by and for the people of Washington state has been my #1 priority issue for some time now. It is a public finance game changer proposal that will:

  1. Generate new revenue for the state without raising taxes.
  2. Drastically increase public financing capacity for public infrastructure while lowering costs.
  3. Keeps our tax dollars here in Washington State working for us instead of working to make more profits for Wall Street.

Legislative update on public banking:

Since the banking caused recession in 2009 I’ve worked to educate my fellow colleagues, and all Washingtonians (and around the US) about the power of the people owning our own bank and how we can use it to build Washington—and our public banking movement is growing!!  Proponents in areas all across the state — from Eastern to Western Washington, urban to rural — are actively working to educate, agitate, organize and mobilize for a public bank.

In 2018, the Legislature approved a budget proviso to contract the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Washington to develop a business plan for a public bank in Washington. That business plan was due in June 2019 but has yet to be completed. Many of us in the Legislature have been working to correct this.

Meanwhile, we will continue building the movement for a public bank.  My current iteration is Senate Bill 5995. Many statewide organizations have adopted platform planks to support the public bank.  SB 5995 is modeled after the Bank of North Dakota, which is the only other publicly owned bank in the US.  While the rest of the world uses public banking as their financing foundation, we in the US have relied on commercial banking instead.  We need to find a better way.

Background Information:

  • What is public banking and SB 5995?  Learn more Link.
  • Or watch the public hearing on SB 5995 last week Link.
  • Public Banking Institute  Link
  • Learn more Link.

Recent victories nation-wide:

  • California passes public banking bill.  Link
  • New Jersey moving forward with public banking.  Link
  • In it’s 100th year, the Bank of North Dakota posted its 15th consecutive year of record profits for the people of North Dakota with an amazing 18% ROI (see BND’s 2018 Annual Report).  Link
  • San Francisco  Link
  • Los Angeles  Link
  • New York  Link

Stay up-to-date:

Subscribe to my office’s Public Banking newsletter here (under “View other topics”)

As always, I look forward to hearing from you on ways we can make the 11th District and all of Washington State a more equitable and livable home for all our residents.

In solidarity,

Hasegawa signatureState Bank Visit

Eddie Rye and Hayward Evans from the Civil Rights Coalition popped by for an update on the State Bank!

E-newsletter: Legislative Update

January 30th, 2020|

Watch Legislative Update

Watch Bob Hasegawa’s most recent legislative update by clicking the image above.

Hello everyone,

During the 2020 Legislative Session, I plan to keep you updated on our progress with regular legislative update videos.

In this video, I introduce you to my office staff to ensure that you, my constituents, know how to reach me to provide feedback on bills making their way through the House and Senate. My new legislative aide Jenny Chang is a great point of contact, and a great resource for the people in the 11th District. You can find her contact information at the bottom of this email.

This session, I introduced a few bills to help improve our education system:

  • Senate Bill 6047 would prohibit school districts from firing, demoting, or otherwise discriminating against staff members who report noncompliance with Individualized Education Plans (IEPs). This bill helps ensure that youth with IEPs are getting adequate education, and that their IEPs are followed. You can watch a video of my committee testimony here.
  • Senate Bill 6066 expands Washington’s existing ethnic studies requirements, requiring the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction to provide materials for all grades. Last year, I sponsored the bill that created the current policy, which encourages ethnic studies for grades 7-12. This type of education helps youth feel more comfortable about themselves and their place in the world, and promotes a greater global understanding. You can watch my committee testimony here.
  • Senate Bill 6067 removes a barrier to people becoming teachers by eliminating a test they must currently take. We are seriously lacking in qualified teachers, and teachers must currently pay money to a for-profit company to take this test. Washington needs a diverse group of teachers, and this barrier is particularly burdensome for low-income teaching candidates. You can watch my committee testimony here.

As always, I look forward to hearing from you about the ways we can make the 11th District and all of Washington a more equitable home for all of its residents. I hope you’ll stay in touch.

In solidarity,

Hasegawa signature

E-Newsletter: Today is the first day of the 2020 session!

January 13th, 2020|

I have many bills in play this short session. Some are holdovers from last session and some are new this session. I will be sending out frequent e-newsletters to keep you updated on priority issues in our office until Sine Die (what we call the last day of session).

Staff photo

To advise me on any of the new bills being filed this session, please add yourself to our daily “Introductions and First Reading of Bills” (we call this the Intro Sheet) distribution list by responding to this email with your email address. You will then be sent the list of newly introduced bills every day, to which you can then reply to me with your feedback on them.

Interested in a public bank?

The publicly owned state bank is one of my top issues because it is a game-changing fundamental shift in public finance that will bring so many benefits for the people of our state. To receive major updates on its progress, click here.  “submit” your email and then click “view other topics” to be included in our “statewide bank” distribution list.

Sincerely,

Hasegawa signature

Sen. Hasegawa’s Legislative Update – 4/1/19

April 2nd, 2019|

Senator Bob Hasegawa’s Legislative Update – 2/20/2018

February 20th, 2018|

Legislative Update: Budget passes just before shutdown

July 1st, 2017|

Hasegawa banner 2017

Budget passes just before shutdown

Budget

With only hours to go before the deadline, a state budget passed the Legislature and was sent to the Governor’s desk for his signature – narrowly avoiding a government shutdown.

Unfortunately, I had to vote no on the budget because it relied almost entirely on a regressive property tax increase that would have hit the 11th Legislative District especially hard. Balancing our state responsibilities on the backs of middle- and low-income families and individuals who already pay more than their fair share is simply not good enough.

I am grateful to my colleagues who fought to include essential investments for our mental health system, homelessness assistance, implementation of the Clean Air Rule and the collective bargaining agreements for public employees. It also makes significant investments into our K-12 system, however it doesn’t really address the state Supreme Court’s requirement in the McCleary ruling that the basic education funding come from the state is sustainable and reliable. The new money from property taxes is capped for four years and then subject to growth limitations, which will put us in the same situation in four years that we’re trying to resolve now.

Hasegawa ENews Feb

One bit of good news is that I was able to get a budget proviso for the state to convene an interim task force to look at creating a publicly owned state bank. As you probably know, I’ve been working on this issue for several years now and the concept is really starting to gain traction. With the state bank, we would keep our tax dollars in Washington State, working for Washington State and not send it to Wall Street for them to use to make profit for themselves. It would provide huge financing capacity to fund critical infrastructure without having to sell bonds through Wall Street brokers. We simply don’t have enough money to keep going into debt to Wall Street to fund critical infrastructure.  The added bonus is that it would generate much needed new revenue for the people of our state without raising taxes. It’s a win-win. For more information on that effort, please click here.

As I write this, negotiators are still working on the Capital Budget. At last check, a number of 11th district projects were funded, including for the City of Renton’s No. 1 priority, Sunset Park, and a study to look at the efficacy of electrifying our rail infrastructure. This project is known as Solutionary Rail and can help reduce a major source of carbon emissions. The budget, SHB 1075, passed out of the House early Saturday morning with a vote of 92-1. It is now up to the Senate Republicans to allow the bill a vote.

Despite the positive elements in the budget, I simply could not vote for a property tax increase that isn’t fair or sustainable. The Legislature also just passed a full set of new tax exemptions totaling almost $100 Million, including extending the Boeing B&O tax break to all manufacturers. This is another shift of tax burden from corporations onto the backs of working families.

We only had a few minutes in Ways and Means to review the full budget comprised of 680 pages across 3 books before we voted on it – and only a few hours before voting it off the Senate floor. I encourage you to look at the documents by clicking here.

Thank you for being an engaged constituent. Please don’t hesitate to contact me with your thoughts regarding Legislative issues.

Respectfully,

Hasegawa signature

Hasegawa in Senate Wings

Contact Me

Phone: (360) 786-7616

Email: Bob.Hasegawa@leg.wa.gov

Website: www.sdc.wastateleg.org/Hasegawa