Monthly Archives: October 2017

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    Frockt: UW dental school woes highlight statewide dental care crisis

Frockt: UW dental school woes highlight statewide dental care crisis

October 26th, 2017|

The recent financial problems within the University of Washington’s school of dentistry is a symptom of a larger statewide dental care crisis, state Sen. David Frockt, D-Seattle, said this week.

“The financial problems in the UW school of dentistry underscore one of the main health care issues facing the state. Numerous studies and reports have shown we simply do not have enough different avenues for people with dental needs to obtain the care that they need. The UW’s efforts at the Center for Pediatric Dentistry, while laudable, highlight the fact that the reimbursement rates for children and adults served by Apple Health is simply inadequate. The state moved to restore some adult Medicaid dental coverage in recent years, but not at nearly the reimbursement rates required for private practices to open and take these patients broadly. That is one part of the problem, but not the only part.

“Additionally, the state has failed to act on expanding the number of dental health providers that could work in community health centers by training and placing dental therapists as other states have done. Finally, the hold up on the capital budget is a serious problem. We have included in that budget funding for millions of dollars for buildouts of dental capacity for community health centers around the state as well as two major expansions of emergency dental clinics and residencies in both Olympia and Spokane in conjunction with local hospitals. These investments were made precisely so those lacking in dental care do not let their conditions fester and lead them to the most expensive emergency room care.

“This week there are thousands of people from our state seeking out dental care at the annual free health clinic at Key Arena. This is just emblematic of the overall problem we are facing in Washington. We have much work to do to address these needs. This upcoming session many of us, including myself, will be working with all parties to address these needs more comprehensively.”

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    Frockt welcomes Murray’s AHEAD Act to help homeless students

Frockt welcomes Murray’s AHEAD Act to help homeless students

October 13th, 2017|

Sen. David Frockt, D-Seattle, speaks today during the rollout of a federal plan to aid homeless students that builds on legislation Frockt championed in the state Senate.

OLYMPIA — State-level programs to help the growing number of homeless students in public schools will be boosted by a federal-level program proposed by U.S. Sen. Patty Murray, state Sen. David Frockt, D-Seattle, said this week. Frockt and numerous other stakeholders and guests participated in a roundtable discussion on Wednesday led by Murray at the Educare Early Learning Center in White Center.

“Sen. Murray’s efforts are very important for homeless students in Washington who face incredible hurdles that come without stable housing,” Frockt said. “The AHEAD Act will dovetail effectively with bills we passed in Olympia in 2014 and 2016 (the Homeless Education Outcomes Act and the Homeless Student Stability Act (HSSA)) to provide more in-school services for homeless students and actual housing stability grants to for high homeless districts to support struggling families. Everett School District today told us today that they have helped dozens of homeless students into stable housing due to the grant they received under the HSSA.”

Murray’s Affordable Housing for Educational Achievement (AHEAD) Act will boost and integrate federal support with community efforts around the country, including those now underway in Washington.
“Sen. Murray’s legislation will create an innovative but community based federal program to support school-housing partnerships similar to those supported by the Homeless Student Stability Act,” said Frockt, who championed the HSSA over three years in the Legislature.

At Wednesday’s roundtable, working but formerly homeless mothers spoke poignantly of their struggles in navigating uncoordinated services while trying to find stable housing. Problems ranged from long waiting lists, to excessive tenant application fees and moving from place to place, pushing their school-aged children to the limit. They emphasized what is well known: housing stability is critical to enabling children to succeed in school.

HSSA funding was maintained and funded in the most recent State Budget at $4 million over the next two years. The AHEAD Act is pending before the U.S. Senate’s Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs.