Sen. Carlyle Newsroom

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    State budgets invest substantially in 36th District infrastructure

State budgets invest substantially in 36th District infrastructure

SEATTLE – Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle), Rep. Gael Tarleton (D-Ballard) and Rep. Noel Frame (D-Seattle) today welcomed the governor’s signature on budgets that invest substantially in infrastructure in the 36th Legislative District over the next two years.

Gov. Jay Inslee yesterday in Olympia signed a $52.4 billion operating budget and a $4.9 billion capital construction budget making investments across the state in behavioral health, affordable housing, education and the environment.

He also signed a $9.8 billion transportation budget that includes new projects as well as continued delivery of projects first adopted as part of the 2015 Connecting Washington transportation package.

“I’m thrilled that our 36th district team was able to secure high-value, targeted public investments in safety and storm-water on the Aurora Bridge, in the Magnolia/Ballard corridor, in the Pacific Science Center and more,” said Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle), chair of the Senate Environment, Energy & Technology Committee. “As our city continues to grow, it’s vital that we prioritize public infrastructure that benefits our long-term quality of life.” 

Both the capital and operating budgets invest in bridges in the 36th District.

The construction budget allocates $1.5 million for infrastructure to clean polluted storm-water runoff at both ends of the Aurora Bridge. Storm-water runoff is the greatest source of pollution to Puget Sound, killing salmon, harming the food web that sustains our orcas and posing a significant hazard to public health.

The transportation budget awards $700,000 to install variable, digital speed signs on both approaches to the bridge to reduce speeds and increase safety. The displays – overhead structures capable of displaying dynamic messages – would be similar to others on Seattle-area freeways.

“We’ve seen success with electronic speed limit signs in other areas of Seattle,” Rep. Noel Frame (D-Seattle) said “Putting them on the Aurora Bridge will help traffic flow more smoothly and give drivers more time to react. Adjusting these signs according to the road, weather and traffic conditions will help prevent accidents and reduce congestion, making the bridge and our community safer.”

The transportation budget also allocates another $700,000 for planning on how to maintain current and future capacities of the Magnolia and Ballard bridges. That includes an examination of how to replace the Magnolia Bridge and recommendations on a timeline for constructing new Magnolia and Ballard bridges.

Other infrastructure investments in the 36th District include $1 million to restore the public dock structure at Pier 86, site of the proposed North Elliot Bay Public Dock and Marine Transit Terminal, and $750,000 to help the Ballard Food Bank purchase land to build a new permanent home and community resource hub.

“As so many of our neighbors have struggled with food insecurity, the Ballard Food Bank has stepped up in a big way, becoming a crucial part of the social services fabric of our community,” said Rep. Gael Tarleton (D-Ballard), chair of the House Finance Committee.

“The new site will be more accessible to the surrounding neighborhoods. The Ballard Food Bank will be able to grow their home delivery program and the Weekend Food for Kids program, and serve as a conduit to connect people with needed services in the areas of mental health, substance use, health care and housing. I am so happy to help secure this funding along with my fellow seatmates and cannot wait to see an expanded Ballard Food Bank.”

The capital budget invests $3.1 million for Seattle Public Schools to upgrade heating and ventilation systems at North Beach Elementary and for classroom additions and modernizations at other schools. It further allocates $382,000 for renovations to the Ballard Locks Fish Ladder Viewing Gallery and $30,000 for the Phinney Neighborhood Association under a grant program supporting public access to history.

The capital budget also awards Building for the Arts grants to support the Music Center of the Northwest ($300,000) and the Nordic Heritage Museum ($2 million), which Congress last month designated the “National Nordic Museum.”

The operating budget also invests in the 36th district, including $2.7 million in funding each biennium, starting in 2021, to make capital improvements to the Pacific Science Center. The facility has not received any meaningful public investment since it was built in the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair.

Other notable funding just outside the 36th District under the capital budget includes:

• $1.7 million to support the Chief Seattle Club, a nonprofit dedicated to supporting American Indian and Alaska Native people both physically and spiritually.

• $1 million to support the Seattle Aquarium.

• $200,000 to allow Farestart – which provides foodservice training and job placement programs for homeless and low-income adults – to make equipment upgrades to two kitchens and a restaurant in downtown Seattle.

May 22nd, 2019|Uncategorized|
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    Carlyle, Tarleton welcome governor’s signature on climate bills

Carlyle, Tarleton welcome governor’s signature on climate bills

SEATTLE – Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle) and Rep. Gael Tarleton (D-Ballard) today welcomed Gov. Jay Inslee’s signature on a sweeping package of legislation that takes meaningful action on climate change and will reduce Washington’s carbon footprint.

The bills commit Washington to 100-percent clean energy from renewable and zero-emission sources like wind, hydro and solar polar (Senate Bill 5116), a centerpiece of Inslee’s climate action agenda. They also aggressively electrify our transportation infrastructure (House Bill 2042), create incentives to build ultra-new efficient buildings (HB 1257), adopt new minimum appliance efficiency standards (HB 1444) and ban products containing super-pollutants, like hydrofluorocarbons (HB 1112).

“As a husband, father and citizen legislator, it is a personal and professional honor to have played a role in helping to pass the most substantive environmental agenda in a generation,” said Carlyle, who chairs the Senate Environment, Energy & Technology Committee and who sponsored SB 5116. “Our work this year goes beyond traditional political clichés and embraces a bold climate action agenda that will make a meaningful difference in our grandchildren’s grandchildren’s quality of life.

“This year we hit stand-up double after stand-up double, and moved our team around the bases by working together. Our dream of reaching Paris Accord-level carbon reductions in the years to come is no longer a fantasy, but a serious aspiration that is within our reach.”

Tarleton, who chairs the House Finance Committee and who sponsored House companion legislation to the clean energy bill, commented: “Today we are celebrating a strong ground game that brought together communities from all over this state, from utility partners, industry partners, environmental champions, labor leaders, communities of color, many of you here today. When we move beyond coal and embrace clean energy sources, we get a win not only for Washington State, not only for the western states, but for the whole country and the world.”

Carlyle and Tarleton joined Inslee and others today at a bill-signing ceremony at the Rainier Vista Neighborhood House in Seattle.

May 7th, 2019|Uncategorized|
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    House passes Bill committing Washington to 100-percent clean energy

House passes Bill committing Washington to 100-percent clean energy

OLYMPIA – A historic bill to commit Washington to 100-percent clean energy from renewable and zero-emission sources took another step forward today following passage by the Washington House of Representatives.

Representatives voted 56-42 in favor of Senate Bill 5116, a centerpiece of Gov. Jay Inslee’s 2019 agenda to take meaningful action on climate change and reduce Washington’s carbon footprint.

Sponsored by Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle) and in House companion legislation by Rep. Gael Tarleton (D-Ballard), the bill requires all electric utilities in Washington to transition to a 100-percent, carbon-neutral electricity supply by 2030 and to 100-percent carbon-free electricity by 2045.

“It’s time to move past the era of carbon into the next generation with modern, 21st-century energy systems using integrated wind, hydro and solar power,” said Carlyle, who chairs the Senate Environment, Energy & Technology Committee. “At a time when the federal government has functionally imploded on addressing climate change, the states are now taking the lead and moving forward on climate action.”

“Moving away from fossil fuels has to start somewhere, so why not here?” asked Tarleton, who chairs the House Finance Committee. “Washington has the courage to build a 21st century economy beyond coal, beyond fossil fuels, to maintain and build a quality of life for generations to come. Thank you to Sen. Carlyle and my colleagues for having the courage to make this choice.”

“We are rightly proud of how clean Washington’s electricity already is,” said Rep. Joe Fitzgibbon (D-West Seattle), chair of the House Environment & Energy Committee. “This landmark bill will take Washington the rest of the way there to 100 percent clean electricity, ensure reliability and lay the foundation for continued pollution reductions throughout our whole economy.”

Senate Bill 5116 would make Washington one of the first states in the nation to commit broadly to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from electricity while adopting a precise action plan to do so. It is also the most extensive measure on climate action that Washington’s Legislature has adopted since 2008, when it committed the state to reducing overall greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels.

Electricity remains the largest source of carbon emissions worldwide and is the third-highest emitting sector in Washington, after transportation and buildings.

The Senate approved the bill last month. The bill now goes back to the Senate for approval of amendments added by the House before it can go to the governor.

April 11th, 2019|Uncategorized|
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    36th Legislative District lawmakers to hold ‘drop-in’ town hall

36th Legislative District lawmakers to hold ‘drop-in’ town hall

OLYMPIA – Join Sen. Reuven Carlyle, Rep. Noel Frame and Rep. Gael Tarleton for an informal “Drop-In” Town Hall on March 24 at Lantern Brewing (938 N 95th St) in Seattle.

Drop in anytime from 2 to 4 p.m. that works for you. The 36th Legislative District lawmakers will aim for casual, small group conversation and try to swap out who is at the table to ensure everyone gets a chance to be heard.

Kids and dogs are welcome! Beverages are no-host. No RSVP is required.

Who: Sen. Reuven Carlyle, Rep. Gael Tarleton and Rep. Noel Frame.

What: “Drop-in” town hall meeting. Drop in anytime during the two-hour window that works for you.

When: Sunday, March 24, 2019 from 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Where: Lantern Brewing, 938 N 95th St, Seattle

Why: To meet with constituents in an informal setting to discuss issues and answer their questions.

March 8th, 2019|Uncategorized|

Senate passes Carlyle’s Washington Privacy Act

OLYMPIA – The Washington Senate today overwhelmingly approved the Washington Privacy Act, one of the nation’s strongest privacy protection measures based on global standards to strengthen consumer access and control over personal data held by companies and the government.

A bipartisan group of senators voted 46-1 in favor of Senate Bill 5376, sponsored by Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle).

“We’re so proud that Democrats and Republicans voted together to recognize that consumer privacy is essential and that data belongs to individuals,” said Carlyle, who chairs the Senate Environment, Energy & Technology Committee. “This bill carefully, responsibly takes the best practices from Europe, California and other states to build a data privacy regulatory framework that will help set a standard and lead the nation in bringing our data privacy laws into the 21st century.”

The comprehensive act reflects central elements of the European Union General Data Protection Regulation and gives Washington residents meaningful tools to determine how their personal data is used and shared. That includes the right to know who is using consumers’ data and why, the right to correct inaccurate personal data, the right to delete certain personal data, and the right to restrict the sale of data in key areas.

The bill also sets out steps companies must take to prevent practices that might compromise the security of personal information and limits how companies and law enforcement can use facial recognition technology to ensure it is not irresponsibly deployed.

The bill now goes to the House of Representatives for consideration.

March 6th, 2019|Uncategorized|
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    Bill committing Washington to 100 percent clean energy passes Senate

Bill committing Washington to 100 percent clean energy passes Senate

OLYMPIA – The Washington Senate today approved a sweeping, historic bill to commit the state to 100 percent clean energy from renewable and zero-emission sources.

Senators voted 28-19 in favor of Senate Bill 5116, sponsored by Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle). The bill would require all electric utilities in Washington to transition to a 100-percent, carbon-neutral electricity supply by 2030 and to 100-percent carbon-free electricity by 2045.

“It’s simply time to move past the era of carbon into the next generation with modern, 21st-century energy systems using integrated wind, hydro and solar power,” Carlyle said. “I’m proud that this is the strongest, 100-percent clean energy bill adopted in the nation, and we thank Hawaii and California for paving the way. Now, it’s up to the other states to follow our lead.”

Electricity remains the largest source of carbon emissions worldwide and is the third-highest emitting sector in Washington, after transportation and buildings.

Senate Bill 5166 would make Washington one of the first states in the nation to commit broadly to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from electricity while adopting a precise action plan to do so. It is also the most extensive measure on climate action that Washington’s Legislature has adopted since 2008, when it committed the state to reducing overall greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels.

The bill is part of a wider package of Senate legislation to make a meaningful reduction in Washington’s carbon footprint.

It now goes to the House of Representatives for consideration.

March 1st, 2019|Uncategorized|

Washington Senate votes to eliminate death penalty

OLYMPIA – The Washington Senate today voted 28-19 to eliminate the death penalty in Washington law and replace it with a sentence of life in prison without the possibility of release or parole.

Senate Bill 5339, sponsored by Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle), makes Washington statute consistent with a 2018 decision in which the state Supreme Court invalidated the death penalty as unconstitutional after ruling it was administered in an arbitrary and racially biased manner.

The court reached based its conclusion on statistical evidence showing significant county-by-county variation in decisions to seek or impose the death penalty. The court noted that African-American defendants were four-and-a-half times more likely to receive a death sentence than white defendants in similar cases.

“I have the deepest personal respect for how important this issue is for victims’ families and I’m so grateful for the reflection and grace of the dialogue in the Legislature,” said Carlyle, who has repeatedly sponsored legislation to end the death penalty in Washington over the last decade. “I’m pleased that our state is on the path toward joining the global movement toward abolishing the death penalty.

“Closing the books on this chapter in our state’s history is a responsible public policy step, given where the courts and our state have come, and this measure solidifies our statute in a way that makes it clear and unequivocal for years to come. After working on this issue for so long, I’m pleased and incredibly humbled that the state Senate has taken this important step forward.”

The bill will now proceed to the House of Representatives.

Washington’s death penalty law, enacted in 1981, had not been enforced since 2014, when Gov. Jay Inslee placed a moratorium on state executions. Nineteen other states and the District of Columbia have abolished the death penalty, and gubernatorial moratoria are in place in three more states.

February 15th, 2019|Uncategorized|
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    Senate committee unanimously approves consumer data privacy act

Senate committee unanimously approves consumer data privacy act

OLYMPIA – The Washington Senate Environment, Energy & Technology Committee today unanimously recommended passage of the Washington Privacy Act, one of the nation’s strongest privacy protection measures based on global standards to strengthen consumer access and control over personal data held by companies and the government.

The comprehensive act, Senate Bill 5376, reflects central elements of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and gives Washington residents meaningful tools to determine how their personal data is used and shared. It also sets out steps companies must take to prevent practices that might compromise the security of personal information and limits how companies and law enforcement can use facial recognition technology to ensure it is not irresponsibly deployed.

“We’re extremely proud that it was a unanimous vote, Democrats and Republicans coming together to recognize that consumer privacy is essential and that data belongs to individuals,” said Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle), the bill’s sponsor and the chair of the committee.

“As the home of Microsoft, Amazon and other leading technology companies, we think about the deployment of technology in a global sense,” Carlyle said. “The GDPR is the emerging global standard on consumer data privacy protection and this act combines elements of that with best practices and lessons learned from around the United States and around the world. We’ve had the support of some of the most important companies and citizen activists in the country, and we think that this act can become a national standard for other states to consider.”

February 14th, 2019|Uncategorized|
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    Carlyle introduces comprehensive data privacy protection bill

Carlyle introduces comprehensive data privacy protection bill

OLYMPIA – Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle), chair of the Senate Environment, Energy & Technology Committee, has introduced one of the nation’s most robust and comprehensive privacy protection measures to strengthen consumer access and control over personal data held by companies and the government.

The Washington Privacy Act, Senate Bill 5376, would give Washington residents tools to determine how their personal data is used and shared, and sets out steps companies must take to prevent practices that might compromise the security of personal information. The act also would limit how companies and government can use facial recognition technology in order to prevent it from being irresponsibly deployed.

“Washington’s economy and social fabric is framed by some of the premier technology companies in the world, and we’ve enjoyed unimaginable public benefits as a result,” Carlyle said. “One of the positive ripple effects of being a technology-driven state is that we have developed a profound sensitivity to advanced public policy regarding the responsible use of technology as a force for good.  More than ever, it is essential that our state – as home to some of the leading technology companies in the world – ensure we are a thought leader in designing and developing a responsible regulatory framework around how personal data is generated, collected, stored and sold in the marketplace and by government.

“Throughout our state’s history, Washingtonians have cherished privacy as an essential element of their individual freedom. Taking a leadership role in implementing guardrails that thoughtfully apply this principle to the technologies and products of today as well as tomorrow is key to preserving consumer trust and confidence that personal data will be protected, while supporting the flexibility and free flow of information needed for continued innovation and economic growth in the networked economy.”

The Senate Environment, Energy & Technology Committee is scheduled to hold a public hearing on the bill at 10 a.m. on Tuesday.

Click here for an overview of the legislation.
Click here for the Washington Privacy Act FAQs.

January 18th, 2019|Uncategorized|
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    Carlyle promises bold agenda on climate change in 2019 session

Carlyle promises bold agenda on climate change in 2019 session

RENTON – Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle) promised to present a bold agenda to address climate change when lawmakers return to Olympia in January for the 2019 legislative session.

Carlyle made the pledge after Senate Democrats chose him to chair the newly reconfigured Senate Environment, Energy & Technology Committee.*

“I’m proud to continue tackling the tough issues of building up our energy infrastructure and addressing climate change, which is a priority for the people of Washington,” said Carlyle, who chaired the Senate Energy, Environment & Technology Committee during the 2018 legislative session. “As the recent federal National Climate Assessment report shows, there is no more pressing issue. I’m excited to partner with the governor and colleagues in the House and Senate to lead the state forward, and in the coming weeks we’ll be presenting an agenda for bold action.”

Carlyle will also continue to play a key role on the budget-writing Senate Ways & Means Committee next session, where he said addressing housing affordability will also be a priority, and he will join the Senate Rules Committee.

Senate Democrats released committee assignments for the 2019 legislative session last Wednesday following a vote in which they elected the most diverse leadership team in the history of the Washington State Legislature.

*This statement has been revised to reflect an update in the committee’s name.

December 5th, 2018|Uncategorized|