Uncategorized

  • Permalink Gallery

    36th Legislative District lawmakers to hold ‘drop-in’ town hall

36th Legislative District lawmakers to hold ‘drop-in’ town hall

March 8th, 2019|

OLYMPIA – Join Sen. Reuven Carlyle, Rep. Noel Frame and Rep. Gael Tarleton for an informal “Drop-In” Town Hall on March 24 at Lantern Brewing (938 N 95th St) in Seattle.

Drop in anytime from 2 to 4 p.m. that works for you. The 36th Legislative District lawmakers will aim for casual, small group conversation and try to swap out who is at the table to ensure everyone gets a chance to be heard.

Kids and dogs are welcome! Beverages are no-host. No RSVP is required.

Who: Sen. Reuven Carlyle, Rep. Gael Tarleton and Rep. Noel Frame.

What: “Drop-in” town hall meeting. Drop in anytime during the two-hour window that works for you.

When: Sunday, March 24, 2019 from 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Where: Lantern Brewing, 938 N 95th St, Seattle

Why: To meet with constituents in an informal setting to discuss issues and answer their questions.

Senate passes Carlyle’s Washington Privacy Act

March 6th, 2019|

OLYMPIA – The Washington Senate today overwhelmingly approved the Washington Privacy Act, one of the nation’s strongest privacy protection measures based on global standards to strengthen consumer access and control over personal data held by companies and the government.

A bipartisan group of senators voted 46-1 in favor of Senate Bill 5376, sponsored by Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle).

“We’re so proud that Democrats and Republicans voted together to recognize that consumer privacy is essential and that data belongs to individuals,” said Carlyle, who chairs the Senate Environment, Energy & Technology Committee. “This bill carefully, responsibly takes the best practices from Europe, California and other states to build a data privacy regulatory framework that will help set a standard and lead the nation in bringing our data privacy laws into the 21st century.”

The comprehensive act reflects central elements of the European Union General Data Protection Regulation and gives Washington residents meaningful tools to determine how their personal data is used and shared. That includes the right to know who is using consumers’ data and why, the right to correct inaccurate personal data, the right to delete certain personal data, and the right to restrict the sale of data in key areas.

The bill also sets out steps companies must take to prevent practices that might compromise the security of personal information and limits how companies and law enforcement can use facial recognition technology to ensure it is not irresponsibly deployed.

The bill now goes to the House of Representatives for consideration.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Bill committing Washington to 100 percent clean energy passes Senate

Bill committing Washington to 100 percent clean energy passes Senate

March 1st, 2019|

OLYMPIA – The Washington Senate today approved a sweeping, historic bill to commit the state to 100 percent clean energy from renewable and zero-emission sources.

Senators voted 28-19 in favor of Senate Bill 5116, sponsored by Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle). The bill would require all electric utilities in Washington to transition to a 100-percent, carbon-neutral electricity supply by 2030 and to 100-percent carbon-free electricity by 2045.

“It’s simply time to move past the era of carbon into the next generation with modern, 21st-century energy systems using integrated wind, hydro and solar power,” Carlyle said. “I’m proud that this is the strongest, 100-percent clean energy bill adopted in the nation, and we thank Hawaii and California for paving the way. Now, it’s up to the other states to follow our lead.”

Electricity remains the largest source of carbon emissions worldwide and is the third-highest emitting sector in Washington, after transportation and buildings.

Senate Bill 5166 would make Washington one of the first states in the nation to commit broadly to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from electricity while adopting a precise action plan to do so. It is also the most extensive measure on climate action that Washington’s Legislature has adopted since 2008, when it committed the state to reducing overall greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels.

The bill is part of a wider package of Senate legislation to make a meaningful reduction in Washington’s carbon footprint.

It now goes to the House of Representatives for consideration.

Washington Senate votes to eliminate death penalty

February 15th, 2019|

OLYMPIA – The Washington Senate today voted 28-19 to eliminate the death penalty in Washington law and replace it with a sentence of life in prison without the possibility of release or parole.

Senate Bill 5339, sponsored by Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle), makes Washington statute consistent with a 2018 decision in which the state Supreme Court invalidated the death penalty as unconstitutional after ruling it was administered in an arbitrary and racially biased manner.

The court reached based its conclusion on statistical evidence showing significant county-by-county variation in decisions to seek or impose the death penalty. The court noted that African-American defendants were four-and-a-half times more likely to receive a death sentence than white defendants in similar cases.

“I have the deepest personal respect for how important this issue is for victims’ families and I’m so grateful for the reflection and grace of the dialogue in the Legislature,” said Carlyle, who has repeatedly sponsored legislation to end the death penalty in Washington over the last decade. “I’m pleased that our state is on the path toward joining the global movement toward abolishing the death penalty.

“Closing the books on this chapter in our state’s history is a responsible public policy step, given where the courts and our state have come, and this measure solidifies our statute in a way that makes it clear and unequivocal for years to come. After working on this issue for so long, I’m pleased and incredibly humbled that the state Senate has taken this important step forward.”

The bill will now proceed to the House of Representatives.

Washington’s death penalty law, enacted in 1981, had not been enforced since 2014, when Gov. Jay Inslee placed a moratorium on state executions. Nineteen other states and the District of Columbia have abolished the death penalty, and gubernatorial moratoria are in place in three more states.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Senate committee unanimously approves consumer data privacy act

Senate committee unanimously approves consumer data privacy act

February 14th, 2019|

OLYMPIA – The Washington Senate Environment, Energy & Technology Committee today unanimously recommended passage of the Washington Privacy Act, one of the nation’s strongest privacy protection measures based on global standards to strengthen consumer access and control over personal data held by companies and the government.

The comprehensive act, Senate Bill 5376, reflects central elements of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and gives Washington residents meaningful tools to determine how their personal data is used and shared. It also sets out steps companies must take to prevent practices that might compromise the security of personal information and limits how companies and law enforcement can use facial recognition technology to ensure it is not irresponsibly deployed.

“We’re extremely proud that it was a unanimous vote, Democrats and Republicans coming together to recognize that consumer privacy is essential and that data belongs to individuals,” said Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle), the bill’s sponsor and the chair of the committee.

“As the home of Microsoft, Amazon and other leading technology companies, we think about the deployment of technology in a global sense,” Carlyle said. “The GDPR is the emerging global standard on consumer data privacy protection and this act combines elements of that with best practices and lessons learned from around the United States and around the world. We’ve had the support of some of the most important companies and citizen activists in the country, and we think that this act can become a national standard for other states to consider.”

  • Permalink Gallery

    Carlyle introduces comprehensive data privacy protection bill

Carlyle introduces comprehensive data privacy protection bill

January 18th, 2019|

OLYMPIA – Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle), chair of the Senate Environment, Energy & Technology Committee, has introduced one of the nation’s most robust and comprehensive privacy protection measures to strengthen consumer access and control over personal data held by companies and the government.

The Washington Privacy Act, Senate Bill 5376, would give Washington residents tools to determine how their personal data is used and shared, and sets out steps companies must take to prevent practices that might compromise the security of personal information. The act also would limit how companies and government can use facial recognition technology in order to prevent it from being irresponsibly deployed.

“Washington’s economy and social fabric is framed by some of the premier technology companies in the world, and we’ve enjoyed unimaginable public benefits as a result,” Carlyle said. “One of the positive ripple effects of being a technology-driven state is that we have developed a profound sensitivity to advanced public policy regarding the responsible use of technology as a force for good.  More than ever, it is essential that our state – as home to some of the leading technology companies in the world – ensure we are a thought leader in designing and developing a responsible regulatory framework around how personal data is generated, collected, stored and sold in the marketplace and by government.

“Throughout our state’s history, Washingtonians have cherished privacy as an essential element of their individual freedom. Taking a leadership role in implementing guardrails that thoughtfully apply this principle to the technologies and products of today as well as tomorrow is key to preserving consumer trust and confidence that personal data will be protected, while supporting the flexibility and free flow of information needed for continued innovation and economic growth in the networked economy.”

The Senate Environment, Energy & Technology Committee is scheduled to hold a public hearing on the bill at 10 a.m. on Tuesday.

Click here for an overview of the legislation.
Click here for the Washington Privacy Act FAQs.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Carlyle promises bold agenda on climate change in 2019 session

Carlyle promises bold agenda on climate change in 2019 session

December 5th, 2018|

RENTON – Sen. Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle) promised to present a bold agenda to address climate change when lawmakers return to Olympia in January for the 2019 legislative session.

Carlyle made the pledge after Senate Democrats chose him to chair the newly reconfigured Senate Environment, Energy & Technology Committee.*

“I’m proud to continue tackling the tough issues of building up our energy infrastructure and addressing climate change, which is a priority for the people of Washington,” said Carlyle, who chaired the Senate Energy, Environment & Technology Committee during the 2018 legislative session. “As the recent federal National Climate Assessment report shows, there is no more pressing issue. I’m excited to partner with the governor and colleagues in the House and Senate to lead the state forward, and in the coming weeks we’ll be presenting an agenda for bold action.”

Carlyle will also continue to play a key role on the budget-writing Senate Ways & Means Committee next session, where he said addressing housing affordability will also be a priority, and he will join the Senate Rules Committee.

Senate Democrats released committee assignments for the 2019 legislative session last Wednesday following a vote in which they elected the most diverse leadership team in the history of the Washington State Legislature.

*This statement has been revised to reflect an update in the committee’s name.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Carlyle welcomes partnership for sustainable fuel at Sea-Tac Airport

Carlyle welcomes partnership for sustainable fuel at Sea-Tac Airport

May 2nd, 2018|

OLYMPIA – Sen. Reuven Carlyle, D-Seattle, welcomed the Port of Seattle’s announcement yesterday that 13 airlines – including Alaska Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Horizon Airlines, Spirit Airlines and more – have agreed to collaborate on a work plan to give all airlines at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport access to sustainable aviation fuel, a low-carbon and sustainably produced biofuel alternative to jet fuel.

“Cross-industry partnerships like this one will be critical to breaking the logjam that prevents progressive industries in our state from accessing affordable renewable fuels,” Carlyle said. “We can address carbon reduction in a meaningful way by focusing on transportation, and I am pleased to see our local port and aviation partners leading this effort.”

The partners agreed to work to meet specific sustainable aviation fuel timetable and goals approved by the Port of Seattle Commission in December 2017 that call for a minimum of 10 percent of sustainable jet fuel to be produced locally from sustainable sources within 10 years, increasing to 50 percent by 2050.

Widespread use of sustainable aviation fuel can reduce carbon emissions and other air pollutants, helping to reduce the community and environmental impact of existing and forecasted growth at Sea-Tac.

The work plan will explore the use of sustainable aviation fuels as well as a variety of other mechanisms that could contribute to carbon and air emission reductions, including technology, operations, infrastructure and future aircraft technology.

More information is available on the Port of Seattle’s website.

  • Permalink Gallery

    36th Legislative District lawmakers to hold ‘drop-in’ town hall

36th Legislative District lawmakers to hold ‘drop-in’ town hall

April 25th, 2018|

Who: State Sen. Reuven Carlyle, State Rep. Gael Tarleton, and State Rep. Noel Frame (36th Legislative District)

What: “Drop-in” town hall meeting. Drop in anytime during the two-hour window that works for you.

When: Sunday, May 6, 2018 from 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Where: Peddler Brewing Company, 1514 NW Leary Way, Seattle, WA 98107

Why: To meet with constituents in an informal setting to discuss issues and answer their questions.

We’ll aim for casual, small group conversation and try to swap out who is at the table to ensure everyone gets a chance to be heard!

Kids and dogs are welcome! We’ll provide some snacks; beverages are no-host. No RSVP is required.

Questions? Call our legislative offices – Carlyle (360) 786-7670 / Tarleton (360) 786-7860 / Frame (360) 786-7814 – or email us at reuven.carlyle@leg.wa.gov, noel.frame@leg.wa.gov or gael.tarleton@leg.wa.gov.

E News: 2018 Legislative Session Report

April 2nd, 2018|

Dear friend,

The Washington State Legislature concluded our work for the 2018 session on time. Here’s a high-level update on our work in Olympia this year.

Environment & Technology

As the new chair of the Senate Energy, Environment & Technology Committee, I’m proud to lead efforts to tackle some of the most complex, difficult and important public issues facing our state.  My goal is to follow the science, data and evidence as we move forward addressing pressing issues from climate change to Puget Sound cleanup to net neutrality, Internet privacy and much more.

Carbon: As lead sponsor of sweeping carbon pricing legislation, I’m proud that we passed this unprecedented legislation through two major committees, a first in a state legislature in the country. We transformed the policy issue by working with utilities, business, environmentalists and policy thought leaders to place a price on carbon to invest in next-generation energy and mitigation of climate impacts.

Salmon: We passed legislation to protect wild salmon stocks by phasing out non-native Atlantic salmon net pens.

Net neutrality: Washington is the first state to protect net neutrality. Net neutrality is a 21st century version of the American town square and it’s our right to preserve access to the free flow of information instead of handing it over to public or private entities.

Gender Equality

We passed the Equal Pay Act, a policy of vital importance to workplace equity statewide. We also passed three bills to combat workplace sexual harassment.

We passed the Reproductive Parity Act, requiring health insurance plans that offer maternity coverage to cover contraception and abortion, and address reproductive health disparities for women.

We passed a ban on conversion therapy by requiring science and evidence-based approaches to related counseling impacting the LGBQ community.

Responsible Gun Safety

The Legislature passed modest, common sense legislation to ban bump stocks that allow semi-automatic rifles to fire more rapidly and to prohibit domestic violence abusers from possessing a firearm. Unfortunately, we failed to secure a final vote on major school safety legislation (SB 6620). As a father and a legislator I am personally committed to continuing efforts to ensure our gun safety laws are particularly responsive to the needs of school safety.

Budgets

We passed our supplemental budget, which funds nearly $1B in additional public education funding, meeting the key final requirements of the McCleary education plan. We made progress in our mental health programs, assisting foster youth and more. The University of Washington and higher education received full funding of our state need grant, allowing tens of thousands of additional young people to receive state aid for college. Finally, our capital budget provides $7.8 million for Coe Elementary School to meet severe overcrowding.

Property Taxes

As a strong opponent of our local and state over-reliance on property taxes, I played a leading role in ensuring we used some of our revenue growth to lower the property tax burden in 2019 by $0.30/$1,000. This is one-time but extremely important help to reduce the impact of the property tax increases passed last year to meet the McCleary education funding plan from Olympia as well as local property tax increases passed by voters. I voted against the original property tax increase because I felt it was excessive and too burdensome on the middle class and low-income residents of our district.

Repealing the Death Penalty

After sponsoring legislation to repeal the death penaltyeach of my nine years serving in the Legislature, I was honored to partner with my Republican colleague Sen. Maureen Walsh and others across the aisle to pass a bill this year. For the first time, the bill passed out of the Senate with a strong bipartisan vote, but it failed to see action in the House of Representatives.

Vulnerable Children & Youth

The Legislature passed my bill SB 6222 to expand extended foster care eligibility. This priority bill for the foster care community allows youth transitioning into adulthood to receive housing and other key services until they are 21.

After several years of effort, “Breakfast after the Bell” finally passed the Legislature. School breakfast is linked to improved outcomes for students, including fewer discipline incidents, better attendance and better performance on standardized tests. We’re proud to move forward with this proven, cost-effective approach towards educational success.

Access to Democracy

Less than two weeks into this session, the Senate passed bills ensuring equal representation in majority minority communities (SB 6002), extending the period for voter registration (SB 6021) and increasing transparency of hidden political contributions (SB 5991). We also passed a measure allowing 16- and 17-year olds to pre-register to vote (HB 1513).

Public Records Transparency

A court ruled that the Legislature is fully subject to the Public Records Act. In attempting to clarify key aspects of the transparency issue, the Legislature faced unprecedented criticism for passing SB 6617 with an overwhelming bipartisan, supermajority vote. I was one of only seven senators to vote against the bill. The Governor ultimately vetoed the bill at the request of legislators to provide time for a more thoughtful approach to the issue next year. I believe the process was flawed and in today’s era of distrust of government we need to err on the side of openness and disclosure.

Conclusion

As the federal government struggles under the current administration and congressional leadership, state-level leadership is more important than ever. As major institutions are struggling, our ability as a citizen legislature to stand up for real people living real lives matters more than ever. Our quality of life is impacted by our work in the Legislature and your voice matters now more than ever.

Our healthy, vibrant and engaged representative democracy is alive and well here in Washington state because of you.

It’s an honor to be your voice in the Washington State Senate. As a husband, father, technology entrepreneur and citizen legislator, I work hard to represent your voice on the pressing issues of our day.

Please reach out on Twitter, Facebook, my blog or in person to connect about the issues and ideas that inspire you!

Your partner in service,

Reuven