OLYMPIA – Following the release of a report by the Washington State Department of Ecology (DOE) on the presence of toxic chemicals in children’s products, Senate Democratic Leader Sen. Sharon Nelson, D-Maury Island, is calling for renewed attention to the dangers of poisonous chemicals in household goods.

“The report released today once again proves the inability of chemical companies to put people before profit,” Nelson said. “Ecology evaluates products and chemicals based on evidence and science – not profits and bottom lines. They already use these proven methods to develop the list of chemicals of high concern to children; they now need the authority to act on what we know is in the best interest of the health of Washington families.”

The report by DOE follows the testing of 125 children’s and consumer products, including seat cushions, mattresses, upholstered furniture for children, electronics, clothing and baby carriers. The results showed some manufacturers continue to replace banned toxic flame retardant chemicals – known to cause hormone disruption and developmental complications – with other products that are unregulated and “potentially toxic,” according to the DOE .

Eight samples from children’s products actually contained flame retardants above the reporting limit for chemicals that have been banned.

Including Nelson’s Toxic-Free Kids and Families Act, several attempts have been made in the Legislature in recent years to allow the DOE to ban chemicals from products as they are found to be hazardous. Despite wide bipartisan support, every effort to grant this authority has been blocked by the Republican-controlled Senate.

“Toxic chemicals in our homes and nurseries is not a problem for the future – it is a deadly reality now,” Nelson added. “I am sad to say 2014 was another lost year when it comes to passing common-sense legislation, and every delay only prolongs this legacy of contamination we leave for our children, our firefighters and our environment.”

To learn more about the fight against toxics in Washington, click here.

To view the database of manufacturers’ reports, click here.

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